Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘intarsia’

2016-02-14 11.00.48Yes, I know this isn’t knitting, but…………. it did start with my knitted purses.  I fell in love with the beads. Who knew????

Because these beaded purses were made for gifts, I wanted to create a pair of earrings to make the picture complete- that’s when I discovered needle tatting.  I am sure that some of you who visit my site have also done some of the other crafts too, so as you know one thing leads to another.

The photo above is my latest design, and it will be going to my grand-daughter for her birthday.  I call it “Midnight Sky.”

I have written up the pdf pattern for any of you who are interested.  feel free to upload it to your PC.

Midnight Sky Tatted Necklace and Earring set

As for knitting, I am at present working on tabi boot socks for my brother.  I have both socks on two needles.waynes socks on two needlesI will be ribbing up the center through the ankle for a better fit, as he has a wide foot with a narrow heel and ankle.

Once I have the heel and ankle sections complete I will be working an Intarsia pattern in the round, using the back center motif as the turn.  He requested a rattle snakeskin design, so I have it charted and ready to go.  I will update you on the pattern when they are completed.  As for now they are a work in progress.  The chart for the leg section only I have inserted below.  This chart makes the top colorful side of the skin to ride on the side of the leg, and the inside has the belly colors.  It should be interesting.

He is a hiker, so he plans on showing off for the snakes. 🙂

Sounds “nuts” to me!

rattle snake skin sock

Just had to share- KT

Read Full Post »

sparky pillow finished

Tada!  May I present “Sparky.”

This was absolutely a fun project, and I thought I  would share the finishing process with you.

The various modes of construction consisted of  Intarsia, Armenian knitting  and basic stockinette.  The subject in the design was created to be a relief sculpture.  This was accomplished by using 3 strands of lace weight mohair.  The additional strand enlarged the dog without adding stitches to the chart.  The background was done in Palette fingering weight from Knitpicks..

Once the knitting was complete, I washed and blocked the pillow top.

sparky pillow-blocked

The outside edges were blocked to an 18 inch square.  Next, I pinned out the dog, so that all the knitting lines in the background were straight, leaving all the extra width and length in the dog to puff up.

After the piece had dried, it was ready for me to start filling in the sculpture.

sparky pillow-creating relief - 1

In this case, the first area I filled was the muzzle, as I wanted it to stand out more than the rest of the head.  The next area was the tail, which he loves to swish around.  After putting a bit of fiber fill in these areas, I secured them by putting a piece of netting over the top and stitching it to the knitted surface that outlined the various parts, being careful to just catch a small amount of fiber from the back of the yarns.

sparky pillow-creating relief -  2

The next step was to fill in the head.  I pout more in the center of the head, then tapered the rest out to the edge of the ears.  the hip and legs were next.  How did I know how much to use- I didn’t.  I just turn it over and look.

sparky pillow-creating relief -  3

Once these areas have been filled I placed a piece of netting over the entire dog, and stitched around the edge of the subject to secure the filling.  Next, I turned it to the right side.  Using straight pins, I pinned down the areas I wanted to flatten, or define.  To secure the shape, I stitched it to the netting, from the back, always being careful to not have any threads show on the right side.   The next phase is making the pillow back.

Constructing the Back

For this particular pillow I wanted to make a looped fringe, using most of colors in the pillow top construction.  To do this I loosely knotted the yarns together, placed them in a bag, and hung the bag on the door adjacent to my sewing machine.

sparky pillow - making the looped fringe -1

With the right side of the back facing me, I placed a piece of tape 1 1/2  inches in from the edge of the fabric.  I set my foot for a 1/2 inch seam.

Using a figure 8 motion, I looped the yarns back and forth, extending the right side loop 1/4 in past the right edge of the fabric ( so I could hang on to it), and extended the left loop to just touch the tape.  I pushed these loops under the foot of my machine ( tight), and using tiny stitches, stitched them to the fabric.  It took a bit of practice, but soon I was moving right along.

sparky pillow - making the looped fringe -2

Here you can see that I have turned the corner.  I cropped my corners a bit, too.  It worked out well.

sparky pillow - making the looped fringe -3

About 2 hours later-  I’m just kidding, but it isn’t a quick job.

sparky pillow - making the looped fringe -4

Now I am ready to sew the pillow top to the back- well maybe.

To avoid any chance that the loops should get caught in my sewing I opted to baste them in place, using some old seam binding.  This just took a few minutes, but was well worth it, as I didn’t have to worry where those pesky loops were lying.  I also zigzagged the fringe to the fabric edge, then trim the over hanging loops from the edge, leaving a clean edge to line up my pillow top.  sparky pillow finished - relief demo

Here is a side view of the relief.

Yeah!  Now I have two Sparky’s!

Just sharing- KT

Read Full Post »

I recently finished designing a ski sweater for my grandson. I charted the back and front, and then the sleeves.  But I wanted to see the finished product first.

1) would I be pleased with the layout of the floating stitches?

2) does the top of the sleeve design flow into the chest panel of the front and back?

What to do?

First task is to condense the charts to 33-25 %.  When you do this in Pattern Maker Pro, the chart becomes a solid picture, allowing you to get a finished view.   Below are clips of my three charts for the sweater.

northern lights sweater front chart clip

This first one is of the front panel.

northern lights sweater back chart clip

The second is of the back panel.

northern lights sweater sleve chart cliip

The third is of the sleeve.

I snipped these clips at 33 per cent.

 Once condense to 25 percent they become solid in color, and the chart disappears.

northern lights sweater front

Front

northern lights sweater back

Back

northern lights sweater sleeve

Sleeve

northern lights sweater sleeve, one half

Half sleeve

All these clips are made using the”snipping tool in Window 7.  Once I have these clips, I insert them into my publishing program  (I use Serif, any publishing program will work as long as you can import pictures from files), and arrange them into the form of a completed sweater.  I create white boxes without borders to cover any unwanted sections.  The results are great, and I can see what my sweater will look like when it is finished.

ben's northern light sweater

You can see that I added a collar for another touch of the “real” thing.

I like the floating stitch design at the bottom sections of the front and sleeve.  Of course this is mirrored on the back panel as well.  I have a tutorial on “floating stitches, or wandering cable chains,”  just click on my “fun stuff tutorials.

northern lights sweater front chart clip of floating stitches

 In this particular case I will be using a lace weight lavender heathered yarn for these decorative stitches.  These stitches are inserted in between my background stockinette stitches and  lay over the top of my work- they are not counted in the base stitch count.

The next project was figuring out the square inches of each section.  Once this was done, I measured the yarn needed for 10 sts, and began multiplying away.  I will be using Palette fingering yarn, and a #3 circle needle for the main pieces, and a #1 for the rib.

I think he is going to love it!

I will be writing  up the pattern as I go, so when it is finished I will upload the chart, and let you know exactly how much yarn I used.

Just sharing- KT

Read Full Post »

I promised that I would upload this pattern, so here it is.  The instructions are general, as I know most of you knit socks already.  This pattern includes the following techniques – Fair Isle, tubular cast on, double knit short row heel and toe, and Kitchener closure.  I have also given instructions on how to prepare for the inserting elastic in the rib casings.    If you have forgotten what they look like, below is a photo. nordic rose knee  high for website

I have altered the pattern a bit, realigning the roses and adding rose buds at the top.  The pdf’s below are available for you to upload.

Nordic Rose Leg and Instep Chart

Nordic Rose – Knee High Pattern

Nordic Rose Hell and Toe Charts

You might want to check out my post on “Oops Becomes a Blessing.”  This post gives you more info on the elastic insertion.  I am still finding the after several washing, the stockings stay up all day.  The combo of using a larger needle for the calf area, combined with the 1/4 inch elastic rounds enclosed in the ribbing works like magic.

I you have any questions, you know where to reach me.

Happy knitting- KT

Read Full Post »

nordic rose knee high finish 1

When I finished these “Nordic Rose” knee highs, I found that they were a bit loose for me.  At first, I just washed them in the washer and put them into the dryer to shrink them a mite.  That helped a little but they were still a tad to big around the ankle.
To compensate, I pulled them up higher, which left me with a ribbed band that was a bit long.   The fix-fold it over, encasing  1/8 th inch elastic bands to secure them around the top of the calf.

nordic rose knee high finish 2

Because I had striped the ribbing, I was able to use a crochet hook to slip stitch the opposing purl bumps  that formed the black strips together (top of photo) to form a casing for the joined  elastic band.  The next step was to slip another elastic ring over the sock in into the area just under the first casing.  Using the crochet hook again, I slip stitched the top edge of the stocking to the base of the ribbing.

The real lesson here is that because the stockings are a bit looser, and they have the elastic rings in the top to pull them in, they stay up all day.

The next time I make this design, I will plan my casings in the ribbed( using #2″s)  area, use the #3 needle for the calf area before the decreases, then return to the #2 to finish the stocking.  That extra stitch per inch in the calf area, allows the knitting to move with you, without seeking a path of least resistance to the ankle- just like water flowing down hill.  The secret is to make them long enough to have the elastic ride above the largest calf portion, so that it pulls in just below the knee.

Below are the charts for this stocking.

Nordic Rose Knee High Pattern

Nordic Rose Knee High Chart

Nordic Rose Heel, Toe, and Border Charts

Happy Knitting-

KT

Read Full Post »

As I was contemplating the possibility of beginning on one of my latest pillow designs, I thought it might be fun for me to share my thought process with you.

Below is a clip of the condensed chart, which gives me a view of “what you see is what you get,” with a 33 % view.

The design is from a simulated stain glass window that I created for my home in the mountains of Idaho.  I painted the original on plexiglass then mounted it on the window of my kitchen door.  The knitted design incorporates the frame, but I have added a South American butterfly to my Dogwood flowers, instead of the original Hummingbird.

stain glass window designYou will notice that there are 2 separate rings of colors surrounding the center motif.  The first, or outside ring, shapes the pillow.  The black edges will be knitted as part of the design.  The technique I use for this is called Armenian knitting.  I will be using 2 colors in each section and will be weaving the unused color in every other stitch.  This will give me a bit of a textured look, simulating old rough glass.  Any additional colors I might desire will be added using a single ply of the selected yarn, and applied as a duplicate stitch.

The second ring will also be knitted using the same technique, but this time the lines you see with be inserted after the work is finished.  This will give me the option of using an embroidery stitch or crocheted chain to add this detail.

The center motif will be created using the Intarsia knitting technique described in my e-book.

To begin, I roll all my colors into small balls.  Next,  crochet thread, and crochet hook, I make a chain long enough to support the number of stitches on the bottom edge of row#1 on the chart, plus 10.  Breaking the yarn, I leave a 6 inch tail, pull the yarn through and tied a loop in it.  This chain provides me a base for my provisional cast on.

Turning this chain over to the back side, I count in 5 loops from the end before I start picking up the stitches of the first row, inserting the tip of my knitting needle in to the single back loop of each chain stitch.  When all the necessary stitches have been placed on my knitting needle, row one of the chart has been completed.

The next row(purl) begins by adding a stitch.  You can do this anyway you like.  I will be using the following method: knit in front and back of same stitch at beginning and end of row for right side rows, then purl in back and front of stitches at beginning and end of purl rows.  This gives me a more compact addition.

I can’t wait to see the results of my labor.  Once I get started with one of these patterns, it is hard for me to put it down.  I love seeing the picture develop, one row at a time.

I am going to drop this pillow top chart into my Designer Pillow page.  You can also upload this 18 by 18 pillow top chart here.

stain glass pillow design chart

All the yarns are Palette by Knitpicks.  The gauge is 9/12  using a #1 needle

One skein of each color is sufficient.  You can also use fingering yarns from your stash. I have chosen to used  “heathers” for the darkened areas, in the outside ring.    I work with long strands of each color and spit splice yarn additions as needed.

I have not decided what kind of back I will create for this design, but there is plenty of time for that later.  This is definitely not an overnight knitting project.

Below is a photo of what I see on my computer screen using my Pattern Maker Pro.

pm screen view 1If you have this program, then I can send you the actual file to work with.

The second photo is a shot that shows how I number the larger areas of stitches, which helps me to read the chart.

pm screen view 2

It may be a bit hard to see, but I have inserted the stitch count of the main color.

 

Happy knitting – KT

Read Full Post »

I haven’t posted for a while as I have been in the process of moving to our new home, so as you can imagine, there has been very little time for knitting, but alas, my Equine Sunset designer pillow is finally finished.  As a final touch, I added a short fringe to complete the project.  Below are photos of the front and back.  You can see that I added my grand-daughters initials in the lower right corner to break up the solid black back (I get board easily when knitting solid colors).

taylors pillow - frontFront

taylors pillow - backBack

There are a couple of tips I want to share with you in regards to this design:

1)  When working on the back, check your gauge often.  Why?  Sometimes when you are switching back to a solid color after working with intense color changes there is a tendency to tighten up you gauge.

2)  When trimming your fringe, lay it over your fingers so that the trimmed yarns fall on the solid black back, and NOT on the light portions of the front design.  Why?  You will be picking off the black yarn tips for hours just to clean up your picture.  How do I know???? Guess!!!

Here is the pattern.  equine sunset pillow pattern and notes

In the past I have made and effort to include all the special instructions with every pattern design, however since I have written the e-books for you to download free, in the future I will be only uploading the charts of the designs, the yarns required, and the necessary knitting notes.  However, if I do anything different than what I have previously posted for you, I will include it in the pattern.

In the case of “Equine Sunset,”  the back chart will not be included.  You can work up your own chart, or knit it plain.

Happy knitting – KT

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »