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Posts Tagged ‘circle needle’

I idea of having to taking out stitches because of a mistake you can’t live with, or maybe just changing you mind, can be a daunting task.  However, it can also be an instructive one.

I have been sharing the process of knitting my English Rose tablecloth with you in the previous posts, so I thought I would share the “tinking ” lessons I learned when  I decided to extend the double rose leaf portion of the pattern.  I had to take out my extended rose leaves, and then about 12 rounds of the previous pattern to restart an additional set of the double leaves pattern.  I also knew that I would have to adjust the pattern as there were only five sets of the double leaves in the original version.

Tinking Lessons– Lay your work on a table where it will have no stress on the stitches, especially if you have not done this before.  As for me, I pulled my coffee table up to my favorite chair to share the weight of the work.

Take it out from the wrong side, working right to left, holding the thread/yarn in your right hand as you would for knitting English style(throwing the yarn).

  1.  Use your left index finger and thumb to pinch just below the stitches or stitch groups to prevent them flying off the needle.
  2. Use the index finger of the right hand to gently lift the thread/yarn up to release the knitted stitches.
  3.  Use a clockwise rotation of the right needle tip to pick off the stitches.
  4.  Use smaller size circle needles.   I knitted with a 2.75, so I used 2.0 or below to tink with because it allowed me to see the stitches and the path of the thread/yarn more easily.
  5.  Remove the 2 legs of a “knit 2 together” by inserting the needle from back to front, lifting the index finger of the right hand slowly, as you pinch the base of the group of stitches with the left hand thumb and index finger. (See photo below)
  6.  Stitch groups such as YO, Sl 1, K 2 tog, psso, are processed the same as a K 2 tog, except that when you release the stitch group you need to rotate you left have forward to pick up the third stitch of the group.
  7.  Stitch groups as SSK, Sl, 1 K 1, psso;  Sl 2, K 1, psso, (left leaning) just require you to insert the right needle from back to front before you lift the yarn with the right hand to release the group.
  8. Relax, don’t look at the clock.  When you finish your project you will be proud of it.

In this photo I am getting ready to pick up a K 2 tog.

Above, I have identified a sl 1, K 1, psso.

In this photo, you can see that I inserted my needle from back to front.  I will proceed by placing my thumb and index finger below the stitch group and then gently raise the yarn up with my right hand index finger.

  •  If for any reason the stitches come off out of order, you can simple keep the pressure on the “pinch” you have in your left hand, then fix the position of the stitches.  As long as you have secured the base, the stitches are not going anywhere.
  • If you are in double about the needles position, tip the area of concern toward you with the left hand.  At a look at the right side.

Happy “Tinking”  – KT

One more thing-  I found that dividing my tablecloth into smaller segments and knitting my circles in rounds( knitting off one end to the other), allowed me to deal with less bulk at a time.  Also, the stitches were not crammed together on one 60 inch needle.  I now have the tablecloth on three 60 inch needles.  It also gives me the opportunity to lay it out on the table to see the results of my additions to the pattern.

And, yes…… I am writing it down.

 

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I mentioned in my last post, that I was thinking about designing a different edge, or finishing round for my English Rose tablecloth.  What you see in the about photo is that new design.

I wanted my last rose leaf to be free and overshadowed by the busy background lace. As a result,  I worked out the following method to individualize the leaves.

I began by working each leaf individually, as you would with straight needles, adding the connecting sts to only the right side edge of the leaf.  Using a spare 24 in circle needle of the same size, I then picked up the corresponding stitches for the left side of the leaf, and proceeded working across the “bridge” (connecting pattern stitches), to the next rose leaf.

Even though this is a bit of work, I find that using my extra 47 inch circles of lesser size work perfectly as carrier needles.  I pick up each completed unit on these needles, (about 3 leaves to a needle). This allows me to free up the stitches on the main 60 inch that I am using for the body of the tablecloth.

I do think that this process could be used for various shapes you might want to incorporate into designing an special edging.  As long as the work is supported on the “carrier” needles, they are easy to pick up when you are ready to finish the final rounds.

One thing I did do, was to use a different color needle tips for my needles; blue for the main/working needle, and purple for my  carrier needles; that way there is no doubt which one to pick up.

In the photo above, I am set up with my main (blue) needle tips to begin a new leaf.

When I complete the 40 leaves, I will knit all the stitches back on to my main needle, then finish the edge.

For those who might be interested, I am going to writing up a tutorial for this edging, and will upload it when I am done.

 

Happy Knitting- KT

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Since I didn’t want this tablecloth 72 ins, I decided to work it until I thought I had about 60 inches.  However, the only true way to know when I reached that point, or near it, was to block it.

I learned how to do this when working on the Princess Shawl designed for the Queen of England.  The lady who published the pattern advised checking out what the final blocked edging looked like.   Her advice was, “When in doubt, block it out.”  The only stipulation is to have all your stitches on needle cords, and secured with stoppers.

*Even, if your project is rectangular, the circle needle cords work great.

For this project, that meant using my other 47 inch circles needles, from 2 on down.  Since I have an abundance of them, this wasn’t an issue.   I just dunked, squeezed, toweled and dropped it on my bedroom floor, which I had covered with a heavy cotton quilt, and used the burgundy sheet to create contrast.

**I did put my attached working thread in a Ziplock bag to keep it dry.

The carpet, and pad underneath gave me a perfect base for pinning.  I also used different colored tips for the original 60 inch needle, so when it is dry, I can just pick it up and start knitting the stitches off the other needles.

Since I now have the right measurements, I know exactly how much further I want to knit.  I also like the scalloped edge, so I will add the stitches necessary to maintain the stitch count to make that possible.

Don’t be afraid to try it.  You can do this with any size project.

When I do my final wash and block, I will use the tape measure to ensure that each point is exactly the same distance from center to outside edge.

 

Happy knitting- KT

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At this point of my knitted English Rose tablecloth, the stitch count seems daunting.  So I opt for thinking of it in units, or pattern repeats, which in this case equals 40 per round.

With this in mind, I decided to share some of my tracking tips, especially for those who are intimidated by this kind of project.

First, I think about only one repeat at a time.  I always have a colored piece of thread of yarn placed at the beginning of each round.  I also place a piece of contrasting yarn in the location of each addition of thread, just in case I need to do some work on them later.  Doing this also lets me know how far a ball of thread/yarn will go–  I am using Knitpicks Curio on this project.

Secondly, in this pattern, I am creating rose leaves.  Each leaf unit has a prescribed number of stitches.  In the photo above, I have illustrated this leaf top.  Each end of the leaf has 2 stitches knitted together, one leans left(slip one, knit one, lift slipped stitch over knitted stitch);  the other leans right(knit 2 together).  In between these two stitch combinations, 7 stitches are knitted, altogether making a count of 9 stitches in the leaf unit.

Why is this important?  When I finish a leaf, I always count the unit to make sure I have the appropriate stitch count.  If I don’t, then something is wrong and now is the time to check it out, not after I have knit 2000 stitches.  

Another check point, is paying attention to the divisions in the repeat.  In the photo above you see the division between the two leaves leaning in opposite directions.  That division always has a center stitch.  

I pause here again to make sure the appropriate stitch lands in the center of this unit, if not, I count back to see what is wrong.  Most of the time it is that I have forgotten a yarn over.  If this happens in an even round, I simply pick up the bar between the adjacent stitches and knit one to erase the error.  If it is in the present round, I tink back and put it in.

 

This photo shows the unit that divides the set of rose leaves.  Here again there is a line of center stitches that you can use for a guide to make sure your stitch count is right.

I often take just a few seconds each repeat to check all my stitches before I advance to the next repeat.  Trust me, it saves you lots of stress and headaches.

My next test will be placing the entire tablecloth on many circle needle cords.  Why?  I am not sure I want the cloth to hang down more than 6 inches from the top of the table, so I will stretch it out, with it still on the needles, then I will get a better idea how I want to finish it.  I am not enamored with the finishing rows of this pattern, so I am toying with the some alternative ideas of my own.

 

Happy knitting- KT

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As I have been working on the English Rose tablecloth,which I posted a few days ago, I realized that one of ways that I save myself a lot of frustration is to highlight different portions of each unit repeat.

In the photo clip above I have highlighted the beginning of the “new leaf” in green, and the “old leaf” in yellow.  This helps me know where I am in the pattern repeat, should I lay my work aside.  The un-highlighted portions are the connecting patterns and divisions.

If it is something you haven’t already tried, you might find this method useful if you have trouble keeping your eyes focused on the proper line of instructions in your pattern, especially a lace pattern.

Just thought I would share.

 

Happy knitting- KT

 

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I am sorry to say that I do not like working with double pointed needles.  That is not to say that I haven’t been successful knitting with them, but I did not enjoy it.

I recently remodeled my home and put new windows in the music room, so with all that new woodwork framing those beautiful windows, I just had to have a new white round tablecloth for the  table that sits in front of the window.

I found just the pattern in “Modern Lace Knitting” by Marianne Kinzel.  The pattern I chose was called “English Rose.”

Of course, the first instructions were to pickup the double pointed needles to start the center.  However, my inclination was to make a crocheted Magic Loop-which I did, replacing the DP needles with a 47 inch circular needle.

Here is a photo of my work in progress.  In the photos below I hope I can explain the process I used simply enough that you will be encouraged to try it, if you haven’t already done so.

Create your Magic Loop.

Insert tip of circle needle into crocheted loop.

Using the crochet hook, insert hook through Magic loop, yarn around hook and draw through to front, yarn around hook again and draw through loop on hook.  Place this loop on the knitting needle.  I repeated this process 10 times, as this pattern calls for 10 stitches to be cast on.

Take up slack in the Magic loop.

Once all the stitches are on the knitting needle, I pull the needle all the way to the left, leaving only a small amount of cord to my right.  Next, I divide the stitches up as instructed in the pattern.  In this case there were 3 sections, 4, 4, and 2.  I simply bent the cord and pulled it through, allowing a loop to form.  I did the same for the next 4 stitches, then the two that remained were my last unit.

Once this was completed, I closed the Magic loop to form the center ring.

To begin the first round, pull the left needle into the “start position.”

Pull the right needle though and make a clockwise circle, positioning the needle in the start position to begin knitting off the needle in your left hand.  Be sure to make the first stitch snug to the cord of the right needle..

Personally, once I have knitted all the stitches off the left needle, I pull my right needle through so that the stitches rest on the cord.  Next, I pull the left needle back so that it is in position to knit the next group of stitches.  I adjust my loops for comfort, before I begin the next section.  I have never lost a stitch doing it this way.

When you first try this it is best to work on a table top.  It helps you to keep the work from twisting.  I admit it takes a bit of practice, but I think it is worth it.  I also don’t have to go back and fix the center.

Here you can see the loops as they have diminished in seize.  Once the needle is full, I changed to a 60 inch circle to finish the project.

 

Happy knitting-  KT

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Not long ago, I posted the photo and pattern of the bathroom curtain set I designed.

lace curtain finishedSince that time I have had over 700 uploads of the pattern. As a result, I have also had a request for a larger version.  To that end I have designed a 60 inch valance for those of you who have larger windows to cover.  It should go nicely with a 36-48 inch window.

Why only the valance?  If you make the valance first, the fullness and drape will let you know if you want the bottom panel larger or not.  You will get the full affect of the lace-and you might not even need to knit a bottom panel, the valance might just do the trick nicely.  I have included the original chart for the bottom panel in this tutorial.

Below is a graphic of the valance chart.  It gives you a feel for the overall design.  This chart is for a 60 by 30 valance.

graphic of lace valanceEach side panel is graduated toward the center.  The original center panel has been expanded two extra repeats.  The possibilities are endless.  You could continue adding the Lilly of the Valley arches to the side panels, blending them in to the center.

2006-06-21 06.38.14

2006-06-28 00.44.01

 

Each side panel in this 60 inch version measures 12 -13 inches, including the 3 stitch border. Each added arch equals approximately 3 inches in width.  If you needed a 72 inch version, you simply add two extra arches to the side panels (6 inches on both sides).  You can also add to the length of the side panels by adding on or two extra vertical arch repeats.  You also have the option of adding to the top as you knit you Stockinette finish for the casing.

There are 4 files in this pattern because of the size.  The first one includes instructions and chart symbols.  The last 3 are the charts for each section.

*Note-  I did  not write instructions for every row, only those that need extra explanations.  These rows are starred in red on the right side of the charts.  The rows are also number, and each chart has the corresponding numbers to the others.  The chart symbols are explained in the tutorial.  I have also illustrated special techniques when necessary.

Instruction manual – large lace curtain valance

Right Panel – large lace valance right side

Left Panel – large lace valance left side

Center Panel – large lace valance-center panel

Of course my brain is just full of creative possibilities for this type of project.  Pictures of flowers, animals, scenes from nature- hum…………………………………?

Happy knitting – KT

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becky's finished purse

becky's finished purse- -casing detail

Knitting in the beaded daisies in the casing of this evening bag requires a little practice, but is not hard.

I have applied the “wrap” method that I use to set the beads on top of the knitting.   This application is described in my first beaded evening bag tutorial, but just for a review I will explain it again here.bead wrap 1When you come to the stitch that you need to apply the bead, slip the stitch to the right needle, bring the working yarn (in pink) forward, then slip the stitch (green) back to the left needle.

bead wrap 2Slide the bead to the base of the stitch.

bead wrap 3While holding the bead in place with your left thumb, bring the yarn to the back and knit the stitch (green) through the back loop.

bead wrap 4Adjust any tension errors before you move on.  Make sure that the bead is resting at the base of the stitch.

Using this same method, I used a string of beads, instead of one, to make the petals of the daisy.

bead wrap 5The only difference using the string of beads is the drape.  On the knit side swing the beads to the right, hold in position and then bring the yarn to back and knit in the back loop of the stitch as before.

bead wrap 6The purl side is handled in the same manner only your beads will be on the side of the needle opposite you.  But to clarify –

Purl side-  slip stitch indicated in chart for bead (single or string) placement to the right needle.  Bring yarn to knit side between needles.  Slip stitch back to left needle.  Swing bead string to the left, hold in place with right index finger, then bring yarn to purl side.  Purl the stitch as usual.  Make tension adjustments, snugging bead string up so it lies smoothly at the base of the designated stitch.  Not too tight!

Charted Daisy

daisy flower charted

In the chart for the casing of the evening bag the daisy flower is charted as above.  The blue square indicates the center (accent bead) of the flower.    The outside petals (bead string) are dropped in on the purl row above.  The yellow square with the star, indicates the placement stitch for the bead string.

After the knitting is all done, I secure the beads in place with a single strand of the yarn.  In this case, the Lindy Chain is unchained and used for my sewing thread- a perfect match.

Here is the pattern for the evening bag-Daisy Flower Beaded Evening Bag

I crochet the daisies on the strap tabs with bead wire.

If you have any question you know where to find me.

Happy New Year!!

KT

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This past year I decided to create beaded evening purses for each of my grand-daughters for Christmas.  As both of them are quit young, grandma might not be around for their especial events, or if I am, the fingers might not be working as well as they do now.

Both of these purses were constructed on a circle needle.  The first one is modeled  with a Honeycomb stitch pattern as I did in the first beaded bag I posted.  This time I scattered the beads on the body of the purse, and saved the fancy beading for the casing area.

taylors finished purseAs you can see, the shiny side of the lining shows through a bit.  Although the photo doesn’t do it justice, you get the idea.  I used round gold rings to connect the beaded strap, crocheting the tabs into the casing.

 

taylors finished purse- insideThis photo shows light reflections on the inside which are not in the lining, but it does show the construction of the zipper pocket.

taylors finished purse 2

This navy purse is very hard to photograph, but you can see the design on the casing.

The second purse is created with the Daisy Flower stitch.  I used my beads to form a diamond design on the body, and did some filigree and daisies on the casing.  You will also notice that I used a pearl bead every fifth bead in the strap.

becky's finished purse

Here are some close up details

becky's finished purse- inside

becky's finished purse- -handle daisy

becky's finished purse- -casing detail

These purses are constructed exactly like the one that I posted originally, the only difference being the pattern in the body, and the gauge.  This just shows you the variety that is possible.  There are many beautiful knit stitches that can be used for this purpose.   Try them out at- http://www.knittingunlimited.blogspot.com

Swatch for you gauge, and then go for it.

Just to keep them in min condition I made bags out of the lining.

purse and cover bag

I will be posting the beaded Daisy stitch chart after the holidays.

My next addition to this project is to make earrings to match.

taylor earring

My source for this idea was “Bead Allure” upload to my kindle for Amazon.

This next one I crocheted with the lace weight yarn used for the strap.  I finished the top by needle tatting a circle.

taylor earring crocheted

Just thought I would share.

Merry Christmas to All!!!!!

KT

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This project has been developing as a possibility for some time, but I finally got my act in gear and just went for it.  This evening bag is knitted with “Navy Lindy Chain” yarn (Knitpicks) and combines both a Honeycomb stitch, with a bead inserted in the middle of each diamond formation. The casing for the facile hex purse frame is knitted in Stockinette.  The dazzling strap is beaded spiral rope construction of  .06 multi iris transparent beads and Curio crochet thread, both from Knitpicks.

beaded purse- night shot

The evening bag is 9 by 5, with a 42 inch spiral beaded strap.

beaded purse finished

 

Each of these photos were taken with different setting of the camera, because shiny beads are hard to capture.  The “night” and sunset” modes seem to do the best.

 

037

In the above photo, you can see the inside of the bag.  You will notice that I put a zipper pocket in the inside purse.   I made a complete purse with lining in a nice cotton fabric, then hand stitched the knitted purse over the top.  This gave me great stability, and as you can see, it even stands by itself.

There are “D” rings on each end, which hold the strap in place, yet don’t interfere with the hinge.

Beaded Honeycomb Purse

I have created a pdf instructional guide/pattern for you to use if you like.  Caution! This is not a quick knit, and it takes patience, but I think it was well worth it.

I will be working on various alternative straps and will upload the instructions as each one is completed.

This has been great fun, and definitely has gotten all kinds of “oo’s and ah’s” from everyone who has seen it.

I have never worked with beads before I designed the bathroom curtain that I shared in my recent post, but now that I have-look out!

Happy Knitting- KT

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