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Posts Tagged ‘knitting in the round’

This project has been developing as a possibility for some time, but I finally got my act in gear and just went for it.  This evening bag is knitted with “Navy Lindy Chain” yarn (Knitpicks) and combines both a Honeycomb stitch, with a bead inserted in the middle of each diamond formation. The casing for the facile hex purse frame is knitted in Stockinette.  The dazzling strap is beaded spiral rope construction of  .06 multi iris transparent beads and Curio crochet thread, both from Knitpicks.

beaded purse- night shot

The evening bag is 9 by 5, with a 42 inch spiral beaded strap.

beaded purse finished

 

Each of these photos were taken with different setting of the camera, because shiny beads are hard to capture.  The “night” and sunset” modes seem to do the best.

 

037

In the above photo, you can see the inside of the bag.  You will notice that I put a zipper pocket in the inside purse.   I made a complete purse with lining in a nice cotton fabric, then hand stitched the knitted purse over the top.  This gave me great stability, and as you can see, it even stands by itself.

There are “D” rings on each end, which hold the strap in place, yet don’t interfere with the hinge.

Beaded Honeycomb Purse

I have created a pdf instructional guide/pattern for you to use if you like.  Caution! This is not a quick knit, and it takes patience, but I think it was well worth it.

I will be working on various alternative straps and will upload the instructions as each one is completed.

This has been great fun, and definitely has gotten all kinds of “oo’s and ah’s” from everyone who has seen it.

I have never worked with beads before I designed the bathroom curtain that I shared in my recent post, but now that I have-look out!

Happy Knitting- KT

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Well- I promised I would work on this, so here it is.

cake pan jacket

I used cotton yarn(Peaches and Cream), and 1 inch elastic (non-roll).  I also opted for a variegated MC (main color) and used a solid black for my CC(contrast color).

In the process of working on this I also discover how to make a alternating color cable cast on, which is match on on the top with and alternating color cast off, both edges mirroring each other.  I think it is pretty cool.

The main body of the knit is done in double knitting, which forms the casing for the elastic.  The elastic band is knitted right in, so when you are done-your done!

Below I have uploaded instructions for this project, in which I have included instructions for the “alternate color cable cast on, and off.  There is a swatch practice for you to use for establishing your gauge and practicing both the cast on, and cast off.

If you are not sure why you should make one or two of these “pan jackets”  then check out this post

 

Cake Pan Jacket

Happy knitting- KT

PS-Because of my discovery, I also can use this method to make straps for my purses.  Having the casing open on both ends will allow me to insert a piece of ribbon into the strap, stabilizing the stretching, and…..I will have two pretty edges to boot.  Yeah!!!!

Oh,just an observation-

I washed my jacket, squeezed it out, put it on my pan, blocked it out and let it dry.   Then  I  observed that the cotton yarn holds the moisture quite a bit longer than wool, so  I finally, tossed it in a low dryer.  It didn’t hurt it a bit.  I can’t wait to bake with it.  I will let you know the results.

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nordic rose knee high finish 1

When I finished these “Nordic Rose” knee highs, I found that they were a bit loose for me.  At first, I just washed them in the washer and put them into the dryer to shrink them a mite.  That helped a little but they were still a tad to big around the ankle.
To compensate, I pulled them up higher, which left me with a ribbed band that was a bit long.   The fix-fold it over, encasing  1/8 th inch elastic bands to secure them around the top of the calf.

nordic rose knee high finish 2

Because I had striped the ribbing, I was able to use a crochet hook to slip stitch the opposing purl bumps  that formed the black strips together (top of photo) to form a casing for the joined  elastic band.  The next step was to slip another elastic ring over the sock in into the area just under the first casing.  Using the crochet hook again, I slip stitched the top edge of the stocking to the base of the ribbing.

The real lesson here is that because the stockings are a bit looser, and they have the elastic rings in the top to pull them in, they stay up all day.

The next time I make this design, I will plan my casings in the ribbed( using #2″s)  area, use the #3 needle for the calf area before the decreases, then return to the #2 to finish the stocking.  That extra stitch per inch in the calf area, allows the knitting to move with you, without seeking a path of least resistance to the ankle- just like water flowing down hill.  The secret is to make them long enough to have the elastic ride above the largest calf portion, so that it pulls in just below the knee.

Below are the charts for this stocking.

Nordic Rose Knee High Pattern

Nordic Rose Knee High Chart

Nordic Rose Heel, Toe, and Border Charts

Happy Knitting-

KT

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honeycomb handbagThe photo above is in the development stage.  I have combined the Honeycomb stitch, I-cord, and stockinet to come up with this design.  The purpose is to create a small bag for just my wallet and lipstick, etc, to take with me when going out for an evening.

honeycomb handbag- inside

As you can see, I knitted the inside in white.  Why?  I want to find what I am looking for without having to turn on the lights.:)

This bag has no seams, except the inside join in the bottom, and that was accomplished by flipping the edges to the backside (purl), joining them with a three needle bind off.

The rolled edge on the flap and the strap are created with an I-cord.

The flap has the honeycomb stitch on the right side and with stockinet stitch as the liner-constructed in the round.

The basic bag construction incorporates provisional chains of waste yarn,  short row shaping for the corners at the bottom of the bag, and knitting the Honeycomb stitch in the round, as well as back and forth.

At present, I am trying out a double knit version, so as to eliminate the need for knitting the lining separate.  By separate, I don’t mean detached.  Why?  Because all additions in this pattern come off those “great” provisional chains, so I have live stitches to begin the next section.

If you have been following this website for a while, you know that I always use this method when possible, as I base my pattern engineering on the short row heel and toe idea, and working in the round when ever possible, as to avoid seams.  I used the I-cord method described on this website for the strap.  If you want to see that, just type in “I-cord” in the search box.

I will be making a final copy of this model in black Galileo sports yarn from Knitpicks.  I will be using a silver for the lining.  The model above was made from leftover sports yarn, (from different dye lots) using a #5 circle needle.   I used about 1 1/2 skeins of the main color for this mock up, but I will probably use the full 2 skeins of the black, as I will be making the strap longer( about 30 inches).

I will post the complete pattern for you to upload as soon as I finish the final copy.

I am sending this one to my grand-daughter to play with.  I think I might even add on of my Pansies…….?  Hummmm??????  or a Butterfly………..? I think she will love it- that is if mom doesn’t snatch it first.

It has been a fun project.  I can just imagine making one of these for each one of my “evening out” outfits.

KT

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The other day, as I was working on some baby socks for our new grand daughter due on Valentine’s Day, I caught myself pulling the cord of my circle needle around the corner as I started the transition to the back needle tip, of my Magic loop.  I do this to prevent ladders, where the cords of my 47 inch circle needle form loops on each side.  The trick is to pull your cord through long enough so that you can bring it to the left under the left needle tip, then swing it down and around and up over the top to start the first purl stitch of the last section of the round.  That is why I always opt for the 47 inch cord.

cricle needle tip 1-preventing ladders

Here you see cord being pulled to the left and under the needle.  This move takes the stress off the gap between the left needle tip and the cord.

circle needle tip 2 -preventing ladders

The right tip of the needle is then brought around and over the top, then inserted under the yarn in preparation to be purled.

circle needle tip 3  -preventing ladders

Once the stitch is purled, I make sure to release it, allowing the right hand needle to lie parallel to the stitches riding on the cord to the right.  If need be, I take up any slack.

magic loop tip 1

In the above photo, you can observe how I accomplish this on the knit side.  Here again, I swing my cord around to the left and secure it with my thumb before knitting the next stitch.

magic loop tip  2

Once the new stitch is complete I allow the right needle to lie parallel to the cord, then take up any slack that remains before proceeding to the next stitch.

In both cases I  continue holding the cord around the corner for a few more stitches before releasing it to finish my round.

Just passing it on!!

KT

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