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Posts Tagged ‘fair isle’

As most of you know, I love knitting something challenging.  That is why I am “into” knitting relief sculptures.  To that end, I thought I might share my thought process in planning for this type of knitting.

sparky pillow finished

 

The above pillow design (Sparky) has become the number one attraction in my home.  Everyone who comes has to pet the “dog.”  I can see that I will be sending this one to the groomer quite often.

As a result of the reaction to the realism of this design, I took on the project of creating another”doggie” pillow for one of my singing companions.

This is Angus!

angus chart plan

This time I will not only raise the dog, but I want realistic folds in his favorite blanket.

relief sculpture fans

So-besides adding an extra ply of yarn to the areas of the dog that I want to raise, I will create increases on one side of the ridges (solid black lines) which will allow me to create life like folds in the blanket surrounding the subject. Fans A,B, and C will be folded under, and the ridge will be on top. Fan “D” is just the opposite. The additional stitches forming the out side edge of the fan ( dotted line) will fold up to resemble the natural fold of the mounded fabric. The areas immediately adjacent to the fans will be filled to soften the incline to the folds.

* To see how I fill these areas, go to my post,”One Doggie Pillow, Done!”

OK! Now how will I mark the chart? Humm????

I will designate the ridge stitches with a solid circle.   I will place a marker on the each side of the ridge stitch.  As I add stitches I will move the fan side marker. to indicate the added stitch.  This way, I won’t have to mess with the chart, as these stitches will not be counted, I will simply knit the next stitch in the color indicated on the chart.   All the additional stitches will be added in the color of the ridge stitches.   I plan on keeping my fan width at no more than one inch, or 9 stitches at its widest part.  I will post the results of my experiment when finished.

Another possibility is to pick up stitch along the side of the head and knit the ear separately.  Hummmmmm…???????

I have ordered a  “fudge” colored kid mohair to be worked in with the varied colors on the dogs coat, and will use white mohair to add his graying hair on the face.  This should be a fun project.  I can’t wait to get started.

 

Just sharing-  KT

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black hand bag

The Gallileo yarn from Knitpicks really brings out the beauty of this stitch, even in black.  This particular purse measures 9 by 5.  Unlike the one I posted before, I chose to finish the flap edge with single crochet, stopping at mid point to chain up a loop for the button closure before moving on to the main body of the purse.  I similarly joined the lining and main body together, slipping in the strap ends before closing.  It worked great.  No sewing.

The button was worked on a plastic ring, single crocheting around the circumference, then adding an additional round (with increases) to make it a bit larger.

The strap on this particular purse is 40 inches long, worked as a single I-cord.  I contained the stretch ( to 45 inches)by inserting a strand of yarn through the tube and fastened it to the main body of the purse.  Once set, it seems to hold it’s length very well.  You could also insert a piece of any kind of piping or cording to accomplish the same thing.

I particularly like this length as I can wear it around my neck and drape my purse on the side of my hip, having it available at my finger tips.

black hand bag- lining

You will notice that I used the silver lining yarn as my main color in the two tone coin purse.  This is not as hard as it looks.  It comes down to setting up with the MC (in this case silver), knitting the knit rounds of the pattern in black, and the purl rounds in silver.  Yes, this is a magic loop knit, no seams in either item.

black hand bag and coin purse

 The companion coin purse measure about 4 by 3, and has a squeeze frame closure.

black hand bag coin purse-squeeze frame demo

I found the squeeze frames at “Hardware Elf.”   They have them in large and small for coin purses, and also have them for larger openings, as for the entire top of a purse.

 Everywhere I go with this purse I have had may compliments.  It only weighs 3.6 ounces.

I am working on the pattern and hope to have it available for you to upload soon.

This pattern includes working double knit on the flap, which give you the opportunity to connect the lining with the right side to avoid slippage.  By knitting a dotted lining pattern, your outside flap will hold it’s shape.  I didn’t do it on this one, but I have experimented and found I had better results with the double knitting.

This purse flap was simply stitched together by weaving in between the layers with one ply of the yarn and a sharp needle.  I did try to insert some light weight plastic mesh, but I didn’t like the results-to stiff.

Just sharing-

Happy knitting!

KT

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I promised that I would upload this pattern, so here it is.  The instructions are general, as I know most of you knit socks already.  This pattern includes the following techniques – Fair Isle, tubular cast on, double knit short row heel and toe, and Kitchener closure.  I have also given instructions on how to prepare for the inserting elastic in the rib casings.    If you have forgotten what they look like, below is a photo. nordic rose knee  high for website

I have altered the pattern a bit, realigning the roses and adding rose buds at the top.  The pdf’s below are available for you to upload.

Nordic Rose Leg and Instep Chart

Nordic Rose – Knee High Pattern

Nordic Rose Hell and Toe Charts

You might want to check out my post on “Oops Becomes a Blessing.”  This post gives you more info on the elastic insertion.  I am still finding the after several washing, the stockings stay up all day.  The combo of using a larger needle for the calf area, combined with the 1/4 inch elastic rounds enclosed in the ribbing works like magic.

I you have any questions, you know where to reach me.

Happy knitting- KT

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nordic rose knee high finish 1

When I finished these “Nordic Rose” knee highs, I found that they were a bit loose for me.  At first, I just washed them in the washer and put them into the dryer to shrink them a mite.  That helped a little but they were still a tad to big around the ankle.
To compensate, I pulled them up higher, which left me with a ribbed band that was a bit long.   The fix-fold it over, encasing  1/8 th inch elastic bands to secure them around the top of the calf.

nordic rose knee high finish 2

Because I had striped the ribbing, I was able to use a crochet hook to slip stitch the opposing purl bumps  that formed the black strips together (top of photo) to form a casing for the joined  elastic band.  The next step was to slip another elastic ring over the sock in into the area just under the first casing.  Using the crochet hook again, I slip stitched the top edge of the stocking to the base of the ribbing.

The real lesson here is that because the stockings are a bit looser, and they have the elastic rings in the top to pull them in, they stay up all day.

The next time I make this design, I will plan my casings in the ribbed( using #2″s)  area, use the #3 needle for the calf area before the decreases, then return to the #2 to finish the stocking.  That extra stitch per inch in the calf area, allows the knitting to move with you, without seeking a path of least resistance to the ankle- just like water flowing down hill.  The secret is to make them long enough to have the elastic ride above the largest calf portion, so that it pulls in just below the knee.

Below are the charts for this stocking.

Nordic Rose Knee High Pattern

Nordic Rose Knee High Chart

Nordic Rose Heel, Toe, and Border Charts

Happy Knitting-

KT

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Finishing up a project is very rewarding, and for me, is not a “get it done” thing, but more of a “see how neat you can make” thing.  I have learned to take my time, concentrating on the details.

In the case of this Fair Isle design, this means securing those long floats we discussed in my previous posts.  So before proceeding with this part of the task I have a couple of things to remember-

1)  check to make sure that all my loose stitches have been secured

2) check the end stitches of the long float areas to see if they have become loose.  If they have then I will pull the float in the back toward the center of the diamond to take up the slack and secure it close to the beginning or ending of the float first before attempting to secure the middle.

3) use only a single ply or 2 of the background color for stitching down the yarn floats.  In the case of this sock yarn, I am using 2 plies of the red.

Below is a photo of one of the large rose sections that I am presently working on.

long float tie down

Using a sharp needle, I pick up a few thread of the red background yarn, then stick through the middle of the black float, repeating this move across the desired area, pulling the tie down strand just tight enough so it lays smoothly and stretches with the knitted fabric.

I usually begin at the bottom to the top of the diamond, working about 3/8 inch from the left edge.  After weaving in the ends of my thread, I repeat the process for the right side.  Once the sides are secure then I work on the center area if needed.  Below is a photo of one diamond that I have finished.

long float tie down finished

You can see that it is very hard to see the tie down yarn, but every black float in the picture is tied down securely, yet will move freely with the stocking.

In step #2– if you find that after you have secured your floats about 3/8 inch in from its beginning and end, and still have loops in your float as in the photo below-

loose loops 1

Here is what to do.  First, if possible using a dp needle, carefully equal out the excess across the span.  Next, lay the work across you leg, give it a bit of a stretch, then using your needle and single(or two) yarn ply begin weaving across the middle of the affected area, as in the photo below.

loose loops 2

Repeat this process with with each span. You will notice that this time I am using the black yarn.  Why?  I ran out of red. 🙂  But I’m not concerned because I am only picking up a tiny bit of the red yarns in the background, so it will not show through.

Below is a picture of the finished diamond.

loose loops 3

The extra yarn in the loops has been secured and will not be moving back to form loose stitches at the color change on the right side.

Happy Knitting-

KT

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As I was working on my second Nordic Rose stocking I decided to experiment with some Armenian knitting in the sole area.  Below are the results.

The first picture is of the area I constructed by “stacking the floats.” What’s that?  I make sure that I weave the  alternate yarn in at the same place( vertically) every round.  The result is a ridge of stacked stitches that are slightly raised above the stitches on either side.

armenian knitting - stacked ridges

As you can see the ridges are quite visible.  Now, this could be a problem if you want a smooth finish, but it could also be used to form a ridged textured fabric if so desired.

The second method, or alternate floats, give you a much more even texture.  This requires that you recognize how to set up the first stitch of the round to off set the floats.  I will see if I can draw up an illustration soon, but for now, the results are in the photo below.

armenian knitting -  alternate floatsYou can see in this (not quite so clear) photo that it is much smoother than the one above.  The alternate floats eliminate the ridges.

Now compare the above methods with using Fair Isle with long floats. Not as sturdy, but definitely the smoothest.

fair isle with long floats

Why did I use Armenian knitting on the sole?  Simple.  It makes a very sturdy fabric.   It provides a way for you to construct your socks so that the areas that have the most wear are reinforced.

Just passing this on-

Happy Knitting!

KT

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This is actually post script to my last post as I realized that it might be advantageous for me to share my” re-arranging the needles” ritual.

1) Leave yarns lying between the needles.

nordic rose - rp needles 1

2) Pull right needle through, allowing stitches to rest on cord.

nordic rose - rp needles 2

3) Select point of needle exit, usually between the 12-13 stitch, or where the stitches change colors. Pinch needle together to form a small loop between the stitches.

nordic rose  - rp needles 3

4) Pull the right leg of the cord through to form a loop.  Release it.  Pull you needle back to the right to allow the chosen stitches to rest on the needle. Turn work counter clockwise.

nordic rose - rp needles 4

5) Next, bring both yarn over the top and to the back of the right needle, so they are out of the way.

nordic rose  - rp needles 5

6) Now it is time to adjust the left needle.  As it is already resting on the cord, select the section of the pattern you want to work on, then pinch the cord together at this point and gently pull the cord through to form a loop.

nordic rose  - rp needles 6

7) As before, you will pull the metal part of the needle through to the left, so that the chosen stitches now rest on the working part of the left needle.

nordic rose  - rp needles 7

8) Gently push your stitches on both needles into the “go” position.

nordic rose  - rp needles 8

Now you are on your way again.

This is my ritual, I am sure you all have your own.  I hope it helps!

One more thing- I always turn my work clockwise.

Happy knitting!

PS- I uploaded a practice chart on my last post for you to work with.

KT

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