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Posts Tagged ‘colors’

2016-02-14 11.00.48Yes, I know this isn’t knitting, but…………. it did start with my knitted purses.  I fell in love with the beads. Who knew????

Because these beaded purses were made for gifts, I wanted to create a pair of earrings to make the picture complete- that’s when I discovered needle tatting.  I am sure that some of you who visit my site have also done some of the other crafts too, so as you know one thing leads to another.

The photo above is my latest design, and it will be going to my grand-daughter for her birthday.  I call it “Midnight Sky.”

I have written up the pdf pattern for any of you who are interested.  feel free to upload it to your PC.

Midnight Sky Tatted Necklace and Earring set

As for knitting, I am at present working on tabi boot socks for my brother.  I have both socks on two needles.waynes socks on two needlesI will be ribbing up the center through the ankle for a better fit, as he has a wide foot with a narrow heel and ankle.

Once I have the heel and ankle sections complete I will be working an Intarsia pattern in the round, using the back center motif as the turn.  He requested a rattle snakeskin design, so I have it charted and ready to go.  I will update you on the pattern when they are completed.  As for now they are a work in progress.  The chart for the leg section only I have inserted below.  This chart makes the top colorful side of the skin to ride on the side of the leg, and the inside has the belly colors.  It should be interesting.

He is a hiker, so he plans on showing off for the snakes. 🙂

Sounds “nuts” to me!

rattle snake skin sock

Just had to share- KT

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taylors purse

I recently finished the purse I was making for my grand-daughter, so thought I would give you a peek.

This time I knitted the honeycomb stitch in two colors.  You can see the blue peeking out from underneath the black.

This project was accomplished with a double knit for the body, with the flap knitted in the round.  To keep the gauge equal while knitting the flap, I knitted in the round only on the knit rows.  I will demonstrate how this is done, when I complete the pattern.  Below you can see the smooth result of this method.

 

taylors purse-flap lining-2

 

You will notice that I used an I-cord to complete the flap edge.  To keep it from stretching, I ran a piece of satin cord through the opening.  It worked great.

One thing that I have come a conclusion about is that you need to firm up the top of the purse edge with a traditional, non-stretchy bind off.  Next time I make the purse, I will bind off the lining stitches, then pick up new stitch in the bound off edge before proceeding with the flap.  This will insure that my flap will retain it’s shape, especially since the outer edge will be kept in tow with the I-cord.

Below is a photo of the closure.  No button to stretch, just a tab of ribbon to pull it open.

taylors purse- velcro illust

You will notice that the corresponding Velcro is about 1/2 inch above the top edge of the purse.  I find that this assures that the closure doesn’t have to be exact to be secure-especially for a 9 year old.  The tab of ribbon aids in opening the purse.

taylors purse-color close up

 

I love the two-tone version.  I think it would be really attractive if you used a variegated  jeweled tone under neath, perhaps even one with a bit of sparkle.  Hummmm???????

 

Just sharing- KT

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As I was working on my second Nordic Rose stocking I decided to experiment with some Armenian knitting in the sole area.  Below are the results.

The first picture is of the area I constructed by “stacking the floats.” What’s that?  I make sure that I weave the  alternate yarn in at the same place( vertically) every round.  The result is a ridge of stacked stitches that are slightly raised above the stitches on either side.

armenian knitting - stacked ridges

As you can see the ridges are quite visible.  Now, this could be a problem if you want a smooth finish, but it could also be used to form a ridged textured fabric if so desired.

The second method, or alternate floats, give you a much more even texture.  This requires that you recognize how to set up the first stitch of the round to off set the floats.  I will see if I can draw up an illustration soon, but for now, the results are in the photo below.

armenian knitting -  alternate floatsYou can see in this (not quite so clear) photo that it is much smoother than the one above.  The alternate floats eliminate the ridges.

Now compare the above methods with using Fair Isle with long floats. Not as sturdy, but definitely the smoothest.

fair isle with long floats

Why did I use Armenian knitting on the sole?  Simple.  It makes a very sturdy fabric.   It provides a way for you to construct your socks so that the areas that have the most wear are reinforced.

Just passing this on-

Happy Knitting!

KT

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While working on my Nordic Rose stocking I did a little experimenting.  Why?  The pattern for this stocking has large areas of one color, and kind of stretches the Fair Isle method to its limits.  How to handle this problem became my challenge.

The first chart section I constructed using the Fair Isle method with short floats, say at least every 3/4 inch, and established breaks on my one circle needle for NA(needle A-front) and NB(back).

The second portion of the chart I changed my needle positions to suit the pattern, allowing me to work across the design portion without any ladders to worry about.  I also did not weave in my alternate yarn color as before.   The results were stunning.

fair isle comparison

The upper section of the above photo was done in the second method, repositioning the needles as I worked around the chart.  Of course, another benefit of this method is that you yarns don’t get tangled as they remained in the same place all the time(black on the right, red on the left).

The lower section of the example where the floats were kept shorter, shows slight dimples( see photo below)in the surface. This happens no matter how loose you leave the float.

fair isle with short floats

If you use the second method and leave your float too loose, the stitches at the opposite ends of any section of the color can loosen and affect your gauge.

fair isle with long floats

The remedy-

By securing or capturing the alternate yarn at the change of the new color, and then again one stitch before the change at the other end, the float will stay in its proper place.  To make the capture of the alternate yarn on the far end of the float smooth, first stretch out the stitches to the right, then bring your yarn(black) firmly across the expanse-

1) wrap as to knit,

2)wrap main color(red) as to knit

3)unwrap alternate color(black)

4)complete stitch with main color (red).

The next stitch will be the new color (black).  Now the float will stay in place and lay horizontally(with no discernible dip) across the back of the red stitches.  I always tip the work forward to check the tension of the float before proceeding to the next section.  I make sure that everything stretches out equally.  Taking the time to do this will save you lots of headaches later.

You will notice that the diamond above is very smooth.  The long floats on the inside that I deem might pose a problem when sliding on the stocking will be tacked down with a needle and one ply of the background yarn ( in this case, red).

The process of moving the needles as I go has  eliminated the need to deal with the “ladders” of  circle needle knitting.  One thing that makes this easy is that this pattern always has a center back pattern, and the last stitch of the round completes the right side border of this section.  This lets me know where the round starts without using a marker.

Below is a photo of a new needle position, as I retain about 10-12 stitches on my right needle, and prepare the left one to knit across the rose diamond section.

nordic rose-repositioned needles

It works for me!  Give it a try. Below is a practice chart for you to try.

Nordic Rose float Practice Chart

Of course, I could do this pattern in Intarsia, as the center back stitches make an excellent point for a turn around.  Hummmmm????

Happy knitting!

KT

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While I was working on my latest sock design, I began to pay particular attention to my color change where NA(needle A) and NB (needle B) meet as I start a new round.  Normally, I make this back seam design lie in the center of NA, but this time I decided to put it at the beginning of the round.  Why?   Since these few stitches involve changing colors more often, it forms a firmer, less stretchy surface; therefore it is a great place to hide and secure any loose floats that happen to be hanging around.  By working your extra yarn across to this area, from either side, you can tuck them under and stitch them down, with no one the wiser.

Below is a photo of the area in question.

nordic rose back seam transition

You will notice that there are 5 red stitches between 2 black ones, this is the center back pattern of my Nordic Rose knee high.  These stitches are riding on NA.  NB is laying on the counter to the right, with its cord pulled across the surface of the knitting to the left.  You can see how this move frees up the stitches to lie closely together, just as if you would be working on a straight needle.   However, there is another move that is just as important, freeing the stitches at the other end of needle A to ride on the needle tip.  See photo below.

nordic rose back seam transition 2

You can see that I have pushed the stitches onto the needle tip so that they might ride smoothly on the needle itself and NOT on the cord.  With these two moves completed, I can make a smooth transition when starting my next round, eliminating any loose stitch at the beginning.

I use the same procedure when I make the transition from NA to NB in the middle of the chart.

Give it a try!

Happy knitting!

KT

 

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cozy toes nordic sock

This is my latest knitting endeavor.  This sock is knitted in Fair Isle, with a double heel and toe.

Below is the inside of the sock.  You can see that the toe and heel are smooth, as the knitted side is on the face.

inside of cozy toes nordic sock

I accomplished this by first setting up the heel section for double knitting ( knitting and purling in the same stitch with the appropriate colors).  The next step was to put the white(or inside stitches) on a #0 circle needle, letting them ride on the cord while I knitted the short row heel in purple. Once the outside heel was done, I simply slipped the “white” stitches on to my #3, and completed a duplicate heel.  Next, I matched up the short row turns, connecting them together with one ply of the yarn. I did this to keep the two heels in proper alignment.

** One trick I learned with this experiment was to set up for the double knitting with a size smaller needle.  If you don’t, then you need to take the slack out of the stitches before you start knitting the heel/toe, working from the right to left toward the working yarn end.

The next step was to join knit last row of the heels together.  From here I continued the pattern of the instep and heel.

At the toe portion, I repeated the heel procedure, joined the two toes together as before, then Kitchener stitched the final stitches to the remaining stitching of the sole.

outside of cozy toes nordic sock

The heel and toes are  soft and padded.  The extra thermal layer should give me the extra warmth and flexible room to wiggle my toes in. 🙂

The basic sock is knitted form the top down, and is tapered in to fit my leg. I had the star pattern from another sock.  You could use any of your favorite designs for this sock.

Design your own.

I will be working on a demo for the heel and toe, and will upload it when it is finished.

Knit-tweaker

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As I was contemplating the possibility of beginning on one of my latest pillow designs, I thought it might be fun for me to share my thought process with you.

Below is a clip of the condensed chart, which gives me a view of “what you see is what you get,” with a 33 % view.

The design is from a simulated stain glass window that I created for my home in the mountains of Idaho.  I painted the original on plexiglass then mounted it on the window of my kitchen door.  The knitted design incorporates the frame, but I have added a South American butterfly to my Dogwood flowers, instead of the original Hummingbird.

stain glass window designYou will notice that there are 2 separate rings of colors surrounding the center motif.  The first, or outside ring, shapes the pillow.  The black edges will be knitted as part of the design.  The technique I use for this is called Armenian knitting.  I will be using 2 colors in each section and will be weaving the unused color in every other stitch.  This will give me a bit of a textured look, simulating old rough glass.  Any additional colors I might desire will be added using a single ply of the selected yarn, and applied as a duplicate stitch.

The second ring will also be knitted using the same technique, but this time the lines you see with be inserted after the work is finished.  This will give me the option of using an embroidery stitch or crocheted chain to add this detail.

The center motif will be created using the Intarsia knitting technique described in my e-book.

To begin, I roll all my colors into small balls.  Next,  crochet thread, and crochet hook, I make a chain long enough to support the number of stitches on the bottom edge of row#1 on the chart, plus 10.  Breaking the yarn, I leave a 6 inch tail, pull the yarn through and tied a loop in it.  This chain provides me a base for my provisional cast on.

Turning this chain over to the back side, I count in 5 loops from the end before I start picking up the stitches of the first row, inserting the tip of my knitting needle in to the single back loop of each chain stitch.  When all the necessary stitches have been placed on my knitting needle, row one of the chart has been completed.

The next row(purl) begins by adding a stitch.  You can do this anyway you like.  I will be using the following method: knit in front and back of same stitch at beginning and end of row for right side rows, then purl in back and front of stitches at beginning and end of purl rows.  This gives me a more compact addition.

I can’t wait to see the results of my labor.  Once I get started with one of these patterns, it is hard for me to put it down.  I love seeing the picture develop, one row at a time.

I am going to drop this pillow top chart into my Designer Pillow page.  You can also upload this 18 by 18 pillow top chart here.

stain glass pillow design chart

All the yarns are Palette by Knitpicks.  The gauge is 9/12  using a #1 needle

One skein of each color is sufficient.  You can also use fingering yarns from your stash. I have chosen to used  “heathers” for the darkened areas, in the outside ring.    I work with long strands of each color and spit splice yarn additions as needed.

I have not decided what kind of back I will create for this design, but there is plenty of time for that later.  This is definitely not an overnight knitting project.

Below is a photo of what I see on my computer screen using my Pattern Maker Pro.

pm screen view 1If you have this program, then I can send you the actual file to work with.

The second photo is a shot that shows how I number the larger areas of stitches, which helps me to read the chart.

pm screen view 2

It may be a bit hard to see, but I have inserted the stitch count of the main color.

 

Happy knitting – KT

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