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Posts Tagged ‘lace’

I know that it has been a while since I posted an article on knitting, but I have been busy redecorating my home.  Of course that called for a new lace curtain for my bathroom.

I used the valance pattern that I recently posted, then added a tatted edge with beads to bring a little sparkle into the room.

Here is a peak at the results-

and…yes, I know, it’s not quite centered….but 🙂

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Here is a close-up of the center section.

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It was definitely a fun project.

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Though this pic is a bit darker, it gives you more of the overall affect.  The actual wall paint is a very light rose color.

Just so you know, the two angled mini-stripes under the wall art are reflections off a mirror.

Using the combined crafts gave me lots of options for the finish.

The setup was crocheting loops of 5 sts each, and spacing them equally across the bottom edges.  Next, I just played with different ideas until I came up with the combination that allowed my work to lay as flat as possible, and positioned my beads where they would accent the arches to their max.

For those of you who tat, that combo was basically; 9ds chains, and 4/4 rings which were attached to the centers of those crocheted loops.

Here is a bit of a diagram-

Lace Curtain-tatted edge-side-panel

As for the knitting pattern- I used the same chart as for the Large Lace Curtain Valance, accept that I only used one repeat of the five arches in the center section.  I also decided not to stack them, as in the original design.

My next project is to tat some pink and silver butterflies to grace my adjacent walls.

I hope this gives you some ideas to play with.

Happy knitting-KT

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Not long ago, I posted the photo and pattern of the bathroom curtain set I designed.

lace curtain finishedSince that time I have had over 700 uploads of the pattern. As a result, I have also had a request for a larger version.  To that end I have designed a 60 inch valance for those of you who have larger windows to cover.  It should go nicely with a 36-48 inch window.

Why only the valance?  If you make the valance first, the fullness and drape will let you know if you want the bottom panel larger or not.  You will get the full affect of the lace-and you might not even need to knit a bottom panel, the valance might just do the trick nicely.  I have included the original chart for the bottom panel in this tutorial.

Below is a graphic of the valance chart.  It gives you a feel for the overall design.  This chart is for a 60 by 30 valance.

graphic of lace valanceEach side panel is graduated toward the center.  The original center panel has been expanded two extra repeats.  The possibilities are endless.  You could continue adding the Lilly of the Valley arches to the side panels, blending them in to the center.

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Each side panel in this 60 inch version measures 12 -13 inches, including the 3 stitch border. Each added arch equals approximately 3 inches in width.  If you needed a 72 inch version, you simply add two extra arches to the side panels (6 inches on both sides).  You can also add to the length of the side panels by adding on or two extra vertical arch repeats.  You also have the option of adding to the top as you knit you Stockinette finish for the casing.

There are 4 files in this pattern because of the size.  The first one includes instructions and chart symbols.  The last 3 are the charts for each section.

*Note-  I did  not write instructions for every row, only those that need extra explanations.  These rows are starred in red on the right side of the charts.  The rows are also number, and each chart has the corresponding numbers to the others.  The chart symbols are explained in the tutorial.  I have also illustrated special techniques when necessary.

Instruction manual – large lace curtain valance

Right Panel – large lace valance right side

Left Panel – large lace valance left side

Center Panel – large lace valance-center panel

Of course my brain is just full of creative possibilities for this type of project.  Pictures of flowers, animals, scenes from nature- hum…………………………………?

Happy knitting – KT

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I recently finish a lace curtain set I made for my bathroom.  I used Curio from Knitpicks for my yarn.  It is truly a luxury crochet weight (lace)with a softness and sheen that is very lovely.  Below is a picture of the finished project.

lace curtain finished

When I had finished the main panel, I decide to get”cute” and trim the bottom edge  with rose colored beads to add a little contrast.

lace curtain bottom edge of center panel

When it came to the valance, I decided to try replacing the Nubbs/Bobbles with the rose colored beads.

lace curtain, beads for nubbs 3

*I know that there are some who will want to quibble over the terms bobbles and Nubbs, but for me, any time a pattern calls for me  to knit up more than 3sts in one knit, and gather it together in the purl row, I think of it as a bobble.  Maybe that is because I think of a bobble as something that “hangs,” and a nubb, as something that just makes a bump.  Anyway, it is the end results that counts.

It has been fun working with this great yarn, and adding the beads was just an extra bonus.

I have charted this pattern for you, along with instructions on how to replace the Nubbs/Bobbles with beads.  I am sure you will come up with more ideas once you get started.

Please take time to practice and swatch each section.  The cast on will be determined by your window.  I advise adding at least 4 inches in width for ease.

Lace Curtain Pattern

The lace curtain pattern includes instructions and charts for lower panel and valance.

* Note- you do not have to print off the last page of the pdf pattern.  As you will note, it has cross stitch info that is not for knitting-it’s just part of my charting program.

By the way, my window opening was 24 by 36, which is the area I wanted to cover.

 

Happy knitting- KT

PS – If you are a Ravelry member, you can get the free pattern there.  Just type in “Lace Curtain Set” by Judith Helms

 

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The other day I was looking at my bathroom window and trying to decide whether I wanted to purchase a curtain or not.  Then, I came up with the brilliant idea of knitting one.

As I have a lot of knitting shawl patterns, I chose to use one that called for a “Lilly of the Valley” lace on the bottom edge.  Of course, that called for working with “Nubbs”,- you know, that stitch that calls for you to YO, knit one umpteen times, then purl all those loops together on the next row.

The results of this endeavor was that I came up with a short tutorial with some tips on how to handle the process so that my Nubbs were neat, and easier to purl together.

Below is a photo of the work in progress-

knitting nubs- lilly of the valley

This will look a lot better when it is blocked , but at least you can get an idea of what I am talking about.  My bathroom is grey, white and pink, so I opted for this silver lace cotton yarn from Knitpicks.

I hope this little tutorial will be of some help.  I mainly wrote is up for myself, so I can remember how I did it.

Ain’t old age great? 🙂

Knitting Nubbs tutorial

One more tip- if you you find one with a loop not laying right, on the knit side, you can insert a DPN into the center of the loops and gently work the slack out.

Happy knitting- KT

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One of my discoveries in dealing with the “yarn over” issue is the uneven holes that are created by the traditional method.  If you are working in a lace pattern, it is not hard to see that the YO purls are a bit larger.  Why, because they are really “not” a yarn over,  they are in fact a “yarn around needle,” creating a full loop.

Since I am a bit picky about my knitting, I tried some experiments.  The easiest answer, was to mirror the traditional yarn over.  Yep, that fixed the problem.   From that point on, when instructed to make a YO purl, I bought my yarn to the back, and purled the next stitch.  Now, my holes in the lace pattern were the same.

Next, I experimented with the “yarn around ” needle.  It works just as well.  The key is to have the lengths of yarns creating the yarn overs, or around needle, the same.

I use the “yarn around needle” to increase stitches.  It makes a very nice transition.

Below are some demos illustrating both methods on the knit side.  For the purl side you would just reverse the process.

yarn over demo

 

This first demo shows the yarn being brought forward in preparation to accomplish the , YO(yarn over) knit.   This is the traditional method, but actually creates a half loop between the two stitches.

yarn around needle demoThe second demo illustrates creating a yarn around needle by bringing the yarn over the top of the needle and then again to the back in preparation to knit the next stitch.  This method make a complete circle around the needle, creating a full stitch, or loop.

Either way, I get the best results by doing a swatch of each type of yarn over before getting into a complicate piece of work.  The goal is always to make you stitches look even.

Hope this helps.

KT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I just finished a lace shawl for my 90 year old mother.  I got the pattern from Heirloom-knitting.  It is an easy to knit, and is especially beautiful made of lace weight kid mohair.  But…. for my purposes, that being stability and warmth, I chose to knit it with Knitpicks “Gloss” fingering yarn, made of wool and silk.

Here is a photo of it on the bed, drying in the glare of the snow outside.

Here is a close-up.

I did modify the pattern on the top, as my mother will want to close it with some sort of button, or frog.  To give it a more stable finish after the finally row of decreases, I just knitted about 4 rows, then worked a Pico edge, to give it the extra stretch that was needed for it to lay out nicely.

As you can see in the photo above, I now have a modified scallop at the top, but it is not as drastic as the one’s on the sides.

The bind off I used was accomplished by casting on one stitch (knitted cast on). Knitting that stitch and the next one, I dropped the first stitch over the second, counting it as one cast off stitch.  Next, I cast off 2 more stitches in the normal way.

Slipping the stitch left on the right needle back to the left needle, I began the process again.   That’s  it!  Cast on one, bind off three.

*Note – Because I didn’t go to a smaller needle, as is sometimes recommended for a pico cast off,  this method created a small scalloped lace edge.  I think it looks great.  It works for me!!

You can get this lovely pattern call “Frost and Ice Shawl”  at Heirloom-knitting.

Happy Knitting –

KT

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This probably should have been one of my first posts, but, better late than never.  For about 45 years I was what you would call an average knitter.  I made useful things like, afgans, sweaters, scarves- you know, simple things.  Then one day I picked a Vogue Knitting magazine, and in it was a picture of the lady wearing a knitted lace sweater.  I had to have it.  I went to the local variety store and came home with Knit Crocheen.    It wasn’t long before I was witnessing magic taking place right before my eyes.

This first project in lace, definitely tweaked my sense of creativity.  I loved learning the new stitches, and had great fun with all the needle gymnastics involved in the pattern.  Knitting wasn’t boring anymore.

From there I moved on  to a little more challenging pattern.  This one featured a spider web pattern on the front.

It didn’t have sleeves, but this old lady does not feel comfortable without them.  So.. I made some.  I wear it quite often, changing the color of the tank I wear under it to go with the rest of my attire.

Now I was really on fire to to something intricate.  so I began my first “real” lace shawl with “real lace” yarn.  The Print o Wave shawl  I made for my daughter, was offered aa a free pattern on the web, by Yuny Jang, of Interweave.   I designed the header of my website with it.

Following that, I ventured out to make two more shawls, one for a friend,  and one for my daughter-in-law.  They were followed by a lace scarf for my sister-in -law.

Southwestern Shawl

by Fiber Trends.

Pacific Northwestern Shawl

by Fiber Trends

Maple Leaf Scarf

by Heartstrings Patterns

Next, came my greatest challenge in attempting the “Princess Shawl” from Heirloom-knitting.com

Here is the edging I am still working on. It’s my travel project.

All this is to say, that new adventures in knitting have taught me to be patient, to be willing to take out and redo, practice stitches and new techniques until I get them down smoothly, and most of all, not to be in a hurry to finish.  I have learned to enjoy the process.  I hope you have, too.

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