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Posts Tagged ‘crocheted chains’

I know that it has been a while since I posted an article on knitting, but I have been busy redecorating my home.  Of course that called for a new lace curtain for my bathroom.

I used the valance pattern that I recently posted, then added a tatted edge with beads to bring a little sparkle into the room.

Here is a peak at the results-

and…yes, I know, it’s not quite centered….but ūüôā

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Here is a close-up of the center section.

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It was definitely a fun project.

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Though this pic is a bit darker, it gives you more of the overall affect.  The actual wall paint is a very light rose color.

*  Just so you know, the two angled mini-stripes under the wall art are reflections off a mirror.

Using the combined crafts gave me lots of options for the finish.

The setup was crocheting loops of 5 sts each, and spacing them equally across the bottom edges.  Next, I just played with different ideas until I came up with the combination that allowed my work to lay as flat as possible, and positioned my beads where they would accent the arches to their max.

For those of you who tat, that combo was basically; 9ds chains, and 4/4 rings which were attached to the centers of those crocheted loops.

Here is a bit of a diagram-

Lace Curtain-tatted edge-side-panel

As for the knitting pattern- I used the same chart as for the Large Lace Curtain Valance, accept that I only used one repeat of the five arches in the center section.  I also decided not to stack them, as in the original design.

My next project is to tat some pink and silver butterflies to grace my adjacent walls.

I hope this gives you some ideas to play with.

Happy knitting-KT

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After completing the Nordic socks, I ventured to come up with a double knit heel to replace the two I knitted in the original design.  Below is a photo of the results.

double knit short row heel-1I began this heel “test” with a provisional crocheted chain of waste yarn, ( as I do all my experiments),then picked up 37 sts using the MC, then set up my double knitting row.¬† Setting aside the 5 stitches in the center, I worked a alternate checker board design for the rest of the heel.

I treated the short rows the same as I would if I were working with a single thread, except for the fact that I brought both yarns to the back when slipping the front knit stitch, and both yarns to the front, before slipping the back purl stitch.

Below is a photo of the inside.

double knit short row heel-2

Here is a photo of the completed turns.

double knit short row heel-4

double knit short row heel-5

Both sides are completely finished and ready to complete the rest of the sock.  You can also use this method to make you toe section.

double knit short row heel-6

I closed the short rows in the same manner as I use in J’ Short Row Heel instructions, using the appropriate color to retain the design.¬† The only difference is that you will be working one side at a time.¬† After completing the knit side closure, I¬† bring the yarn to the front, then turn the work around. With the left needle tip, I pick up the slipped st in the row below the stitch to the right of the slipped st, place it on the needle, then turn the work again back to my original knitting position, then purl the two stitches together.¬† The rest is the same.

I have charted this design, you can upload to practice with in the near future, but for now, it’s something you might think about trying.¬† The instructional PDF includes several charts for you to choose from. I have also included some illustrations.

Double Knit Short Row Nordic Heel

I definitely will be using this in my next knee high stocking design, and my husbands socks as well.

Happy knitting !!!

KT

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This project has been a delight to work on.  It not only is colorful but has given me the opportunity to use various yarns and weights in the same project.  My Red Hat Silkie pillow is also another of my knitted sculpture designs.  Below is a photo of the top blocked on the needles, awaiting the back portion to be finished.

ms red hat silkie pillow top

This project incorporates, lace weight floating chains over a fingering yarn base, lace weight mohair in different strand counts to create raised areas in the design for the sculptured relief, a lace weight crocheted ruffle on the parasol, and crocheted chain detail on feet, hat and swirls.

Below is a photo of the sculptured relief areas.

silkie relief portions

As you can see I concentrated mainly on the chest and tail area.  I was able to accomplish this by just adding an extra strand of the lace weight mohair when knitting in these spots.  I used 3 strands for the flat, and 4 strands for the raised.  It worked great!   As in all my sculpted designs, it is secured on the back with a 3 step process.

1)  encircling the area with a yarn strand, or strands, then pulling in the area to return to the original gauge

2) filling the area with yarn or fiber fill

3) over laying the area with netting or Tule, then stitching it down with a single ply of the appropriate yarn color. this insures that it will hold it’s shape, even when it is washed.

I can’t wait to get the back done.¬† The design for the back uses the same floating chain design as I used for the front.

I will update the photo of the finished produce soon, as Ms Silkie is scheduled to make her debut at a Red Hat gathering in southern Idaho in May.

Just thought I would share-

KT

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Last night I finished my newly designed Moccasin slipper, and I was anxious to share it with you, so I have uploaded the pictures below.  I hope you like the design.

As I mentioned in the last couple of posts, this project was constructed using the Twine knitting technique  and shaped with short rows.

Here is a closer look at the upper toe section of the pattern.  I have  knitted a casing around the back and sides, which aligns with the casing I designed in the instep flap.   A 24 inch crocheted chain of both colors cinches the Moccasin in for a perfect fit.

The slipper on the right was my original pattern.  It is enough to say that I am pleased with the results of my labors.  I will be ordering the yarn for the second one, as this creation was done out of  my stash (my play around yarn).  I am planning on knitting snowflake knee socks to match.  I might even put them together.  Where I live it gets cold in the winter, and a extra Thermo layer would be nice.

As you can see the side chain, which can be done with a crochet hook or can be stitch as a embroidery chain stitch, pulls it all together.

This has been a fun project.

Happy knitting,

KT

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This project has been particularly interesting, as I not only had fun knitting Intarsia , Armenian knitting and Fair Isle, but I also was able to combine three different types of yarns in this design.  The border was done in fingering yarn with lace weight wool and silk strands of  free floating chains riding over the top.

The chicks were especially fun to do with a combination of Aloft mohair, added to a ply of fingering yarn.  Their  3D look was accomplished by adding an additional  two strands of the black mohair to the belly and wing area.  Adding these extra strands automatically increased the gauge without changing the stitch count.  I was able to restore the  gauge around the area by filling the void with poly fill stuffing, then running a few strands of lace weight across the back, side to side, and top to bottom.   Taking up the slack with these strands, allowed me to contract the surrounding stitches back to their proper gauge.  The next move after blocking the top was covering the back with nylon net, (great stuff, by the way) and stitching around the expanded portion of the chicks,so that it would remain securely in place.

The ¬†combination of the Mohair and the 3 D affect ¬†made my chicks look like the little “fuzz balls” they really are. ¬† ¬† They are the first thing people touch when they pick up the pillow and comment, ” Oh my gosh! ¬†They look so real!” ¬†And so they do.

The details on the legs, feet, and beak were done with duplicate stitches and crocheted chains of one and two plies of the various yarns.   The various shades on the hen are yarns that have been blended, using  of one ply of each color that have been hand spun back together.   Check out my post on blending yarns if you are interested .

So….the most clarifying ¬†statement I can make about this pillow is that I was never bored knitting it. ¬†It definitely was a challenge to my adventurous knitting spirit.

I also loved working with the free floating chains on the frame of the picture. ¬†Of course as I looked at it more closely I realized this free floating chain pattern would look great on the bottom of a tunic, or the cuff area of a sleeve, or…….. ¬†Hummm???? ¬†Maybe? ¬† …….

I have included a ¬†tutorial describing the entire process with this ¬†pattern. ¬†I even included charts for practicing the process. ¬†This tutorial is also on my “Fun Stuff”page. ¬†It includes a sample swatch chart of the border for you to practice with. ¬†Enjoy!

At present the pattern is available  in my Ravelry  and Etsy stores.

Again, it was an extremely fun knit.

Happy Knitting

KT

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It definitely is Spring around here, as the wild  flowers are blooming and the mountains are turning green.  Add this to the birds singing and the butterflies checking out the blooms and next thing you know I found myself drawing up a new pillow design of daisies and butterflies.

As before, this chart is gauged for 8 stitches and 11 rows, knitted with fingering yarn.  I will be using Knitpicks Palette yarn for this design.  The chart for the detailed crocheted lines and specialty stitches are included in the download.  The knitted cording instructions are in the PDF file listed below.

Of course, you can use the center motif on other projects. ¬†Here is the pattern –¬†daisies and butterfly pillow

For knitted cording instructions, Knitted Cording Instructions   This file includes instructions for joining knitted back.

Give it a try –

KT

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I just finished another Whitetail Buck pillow.  This one has a knitted cording incorporated into the pillow top, along with the seam allowance to help in sewing it to a cloth back.   I even made my own cording.  It was fun!

The picture below is a “snip-it” of a section of the cord that frames the pillow. ¬†Here you see it in contrast with the cloth back. ¬† I have to say that there is no comparison to the commercial cording available. ¬†I have tried finding complimentary edging for this use, but have always been disappointed. ¬†The fillers they use are mostly cotton, and seem lumpy at best, not to mention that they take a much longer time to dry. ¬†That is why I decided on this approach-make your own. ¬†In addition, there is no better match in color than the actual yarn you are using in your project.

I will be adding this pattern to the Pattern Catalog page, so feel free to upload it.  The pattern contains 18 pages of detailed charts and instructions.  You can use Intarsia, Armenian Knitting, and sections of Fair Isle in this project.

The Basics

1.  Knit the Basic chart.

2. Identify and secure all loose stitches

3. Weave in the ends

4. Block pillow top on needles (This works great!)

4. Pick up stitches to begin tube for cording

5. Knit tubing

6. Close tubing, and make button hole opening for cording.

7. Knit seam allowance

8.  (opt)  Secure pillow top to woven fabric.

9. Prepare fabric back, and sew to pillow top, make cording.

10. Insert cording.  Stitch pillow close.  Adjust cording.  Close cording opening.

10. Decide on some of the options I have for making the pillow cover removable for washing.

The pattern walks you through all the above issues. ¬†Wow!! ¬†And that ALL??? ¬†I’m tired just making the list. ¬†But trust me, it was worth it. ¬†My friend Deb at Tempting Tangles ( see link on side bar) has given it her approval.

¬†You will also be given instructions on making your own cording out of poly quilt batting, which, of course, makes it lighter, and easier to dry when washed. ¬†This particular pattern is backed with fabric that has been pre-washed, so the entire pillow can be “dunked” in Wool wash, squeezed out, then air dried without much fuss.

My hope that you will try your hand at color knitting. ¬†I also hope you will take a look at my “Painting with Yarn” E-book when it comes off the press. ¬†The book contains all my color knitting experience on this project, along with detailed illustrations and how to’s, or what I call, “Technical Tutoring.” ¬†I hope to have it available for you soon. ¬†Would you believe it, I am already up to 60 pages!

As a side note, I will be uploading a couple of new tutorials on my “Multi-color Knitting Tips” page. ¬†Check them out.

Happy Knitting!

KT

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