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Posts Tagged ‘double-knit design’

cozy toes nordic sock

As I was working on the second sock  I decided to take some photos of the double heel set-up.

First, let me say that I have discovered that using a needle  at least two sizes smaller for setting up double knitting, gives a much smooth transition than doing it with the needles designated for the field. So…, since I am using a #3 for the main knit, I will be using a #1 when setting up the double knit for the heel.

cosy toes-heel set upDouble Knit Set-up

Using my #1, I knitted the first stitch with the MC, leaving it on the needle, I brought both the yarns(MC and CC) through to the front; with the CC  I purled into the same stitch.  To repeat, bring both yarns to the back, then knit the next stitch with the MC. Bring both yarns front, and purl in the same stitch.  Work all the heel stitches this way.  You should have twice the amount of heel stitches on your needle. The next step is to pull the #1 through all the way so that the stitches are now on the right end tip of the circle needle.  This puts them in position to be slipped off onto the two tips of the #0 needle.

Pick up a #0 circle needle.  Fold your #0  in half so that both ends face the same direction.

cosy toes-dividing sts

You can see that I have positioned the tips between the thumb and index finger of my right hand.

cosy toes-dividing sts-2By rocking my wrist forward and backward, I pick up the MC from back to front, with the nearest needle, the CC stitch is picked up in the same manner, with the farthest needle.  The trick is to keep your right hand thumb on the stitches just picked off.

cosy toes-dividing sts-3

You can see in the photo above how it looks as you progress across the row.

cosy toes-dividing sts-4Once you have them divided onto the two points of the needle, it is time to set up for knitting the MC heel on my #3’s.  To do this just turn the needles around so that the working yarn is on you right.  Now pull the #0 needle holding your CC through, so that the stitches ride on the cord.

cosy toes-dividing sts-5

*Note- you will find that knitting off the #o holder, leaves you ample room for the larger needle and makes a smooth transition.

cosy toes-ready to knit heel

Next, pick up the #3, slip the first stitch, and purl across, beginning your short row heel.  Once the #0 is released from this row, pull it through so both side hang out evenly.  I actually tie a loose knot in the coil and let it hang.  This needle serves as  a stitch holder for the CC stitches of the inside heel.

cosy toes-ready to knit heel- keep cc sts out of the way

Complete the MC short row heel, ending on a knit row.  Why?  This will set up our working yarn in the proper order to complete the round that was interrupted when the heel was begun.

cosy toes- picking up cc sts for second heel

After transferring the finished MC heel stitches onto a spare #1 or #0, beginning at the right edge, with the purl side of the MC heel facing you; with #0 needle, pick up the stitches for the inside CC heel.

cosy toes- photo of inside heel

Here you can see the stockinette stitches of the inside CC heel.  Beginning in the knit side, complete the short row heel, ending with a purl row.  Now both working yarns are in position to complete the original round.

Below are some photos of the completed heels.

cosy toes- photo of opposing heelsYou will notice that the purl sides oppose each other.

cosy toes- lining up short row turn ridges of inside heelsOnce the two heals are completed, line up the short row turns as shown in the photo, and loosely stitch them together, weaving in the ends of your yarn.  I have found that using a piece of the MC works best.  Now turn the heels inside each other, both sides should be in stockinette.  Slip the stitches alternately back onto your the right tip of your #3 needle. Pull the cord through, in preparation to complete the original round.  The heel stitches riding on the cord should  in the same order as in the first photo in this post.  Now complete you chosen chart for the instep section.

When you come to the heel portion with the two colors, knit the MC and CC together with the MC.  At the same time you will be weaving in the CC behind every other stitch.

From this point on you just complete the charts you have chosen for the instep and sole section until you get to the toe.  Repeat the process as for the heel on the amount of chosen stitches.  Join the two together, and Kitchener stitch the remaining stitches to the matching sole stitches.

* I interlock the first  and last two stitches, before I start my Kitchener in order to eliminate the bulk at the beginning and end. Using 2 #0 DP needles makes this process much easier.  Click on the link to “Techknitter” for instructions.

Here are some additional ideas and instructions.  Nordic Boot Sock Ideas

Chart tips-For this and any other project requiring a chart I have found that “whiteout tape” you can get at Staple or stationary supply, works great for keeping track of where you are.

cozy toes chart tipIt peels off easily and can be moved up the chart as required.  You will notice in this photo that I also have used it to mark the out the section for the heel.  As you can see it great for any application where you need to mark your progress.

Happy knitting!

KT

PS- You can find the original version of these stockings at Knitting Daily.

*The original stocking, uses a Shepherds heel.  It works well, but I prefer the short row version.

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cozy toes nordic sock

This is my latest knitting endeavor.  This sock is knitted in Fair Isle, with a double heel and toe.

Below is the inside of the sock.  You can see that the toe and heel are smooth, as the knitted side is on the face.

inside of cozy toes nordic sock

I accomplished this by first setting up the heel section for double knitting ( knitting and purling in the same stitch with the appropriate colors).  The next step was to put the white(or inside stitches) on a #0 circle needle, letting them ride on the cord while I knitted the short row heel in purple. Once the outside heel was done, I simply slipped the “white” stitches on to my #3, and completed a duplicate heel.  Next, I matched up the short row turns, connecting them together with one ply of the yarn. I did this to keep the two heels in proper alignment.

** One trick I learned with this experiment was to set up for the double knitting with a size smaller needle.  If you don’t, then you need to take the slack out of the stitches before you start knitting the heel/toe, working from the right to left toward the working yarn end.

The next step was to join knit last row of the heels together.  From here I continued the pattern of the instep and heel.

At the toe portion, I repeated the heel procedure, joined the two toes together as before, then Kitchener stitched the final stitches to the remaining stitching of the sole.

outside of cozy toes nordic sock

The heel and toes are  soft and padded.  The extra thermal layer should give me the extra warmth and flexible room to wiggle my toes in. 🙂

The basic sock is knitted form the top down, and is tapered in to fit my leg. I had the star pattern from another sock.  You could use any of your favorite designs for this sock.

Design your own.

I will be working on a demo for the heel and toe, and will upload it when it is finished.

Knit-tweaker

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Today I finished my Red Hat Silkie pillow.  This has been a joy to work on, and soon I will be sharing the pattern on my Designer Pillows page, but for now here she is ready for her debut in Southern Idaho.

ms slikie - red hat pillow

Here is the back-

ms slikie - red hat pillow back

I love the floating red chains over the purple background.  I think this would make a lovely fabric for various projects.

I hope to make a video of the the process soon, as this color combo should make it very easy to see.  Will upload it ASAP.

KT

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Today I just finished the first of a series of e-books focused on my adventures in color knitting.  It has been a real challenge as well as a great joy to put together.  My hope is that someone will get something out of it.  If not, then perhaps some member of my family will be able to “pick” grandma’s brain when I’m gone.

The 26 page book I am uploading for you is mostly focused on Intarsia, although I do have a section on knitting and purling with both hands.  The information and illustrations in it are from my experience in developing my designer pillow patterns, which are intense color knitting; thus the title“Intarsiamania.”  The book has two sections.  The first deals with Intarsia basics; the second, focuses on yarn management.

Capture

Painting with Yarn – Intarsiamania

I hope you enjoy the book.   I hope that some of the techniques will be helpful on your next color knitting project.

Happy knitting-  KT

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I just finished knitting a pair of infant socks for our expected arrival in about 2 weeks.  Since my daughter’s theme is “Jungle Pets,”  I decided to do an elephant head on the leg portion of the sock.  Below is the right foot.  I flipped the head chart for the left foot, so that they face each other.  If you noticed the color variation in the photo, it  is due to the fact that the sock is not quite dry yet. 🙂

elephant sock

I used the same method as I described in the “Seamless Cables Tutorial”   to join the outside edge of the design, so as to not have a seam in my sock.  The inner ears of pink are one area that I chose to use the Fair Isle approach, as it eliminated the need to add additional yarn strands to the design, thus cutting down the number of yarn ends having to be woven in at the completion of the project.   On this particular sock, I chose to interlock the rows at the color change on the right edge of the design.

cropped elephant sock

I have also discovered that it is advantageous to leave a longer tail when adding an additional yarn, as these shorter strands(double or single ply) can be used to add duplicate stitches for detail(such as the eye or added grey stitch at the bottom that opens his mouth a bit).

POINT!!  I don’t like to have any more yarn strands to weave in than is absolutely necessary.

When I find the time, I will try to write up a row by row tutorial for the charted design so you can become better acquainted with the technique, but for now, I just wanted to give you a sneak peek at what I did with it.

Happy knitting – KT

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Since I got into the “slipper mode” a few weeks ago, I have been playing around with ideas to warm my cold feet.  The howling winds outside and the snow covering the ground, are constant reminded to get busy, so I forged ahead.

Tonight I finally finished my new design, for a partially felted slipper.  Why, partially?  Its sole and sides are felted, while the upper toe and instep area is twined knitted in wool.  The ankle and upper leg are ribbed, then the leg warmer cuff is knitted with a fun fur and 4 ply wool knitted together.  It will be after the holidays before I get the pattern written up, but thought you might like to see it anyway.

felted slipper with leg warmer cuff

The leg warmer section can be as long as you like.  I’ve already decided I will make this section about 12 inches, so I can pull it up when things get really cold; otherwise it just stacks neatly on the top of the foot.

felted slipper with leg warmer cuf 2 f

As you can see in the photo, I used two colors in the felted area, while using two strands of black in the sole.

Below is a peek at the felted section before the knitted upper toe and instep area was attached.

felted slipper before upper toe attached

I felted this by hand, leaving the circle needle cords in the finishing stitches.

It was a fun project.

KT

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Last night I finished my newly designed Moccasin slipper, and I was anxious to share it with you, so I have uploaded the pictures below.  I hope you like the design.

As I mentioned in the last couple of posts, this project was constructed using the Twine knitting technique  and shaped with short rows.

Here is a closer look at the upper toe section of the pattern.  I have  knitted a casing around the back and sides, which aligns with the casing I designed in the instep flap.   A 24 inch crocheted chain of both colors cinches the Moccasin in for a perfect fit.

The slipper on the right was my original pattern.  It is enough to say that I am pleased with the results of my labors.  I will be ordering the yarn for the second one, as this creation was done out of  my stash (my play around yarn).  I am planning on knitting snowflake knee socks to match.  I might even put them together.  Where I live it gets cold in the winter, and a extra Thermo layer would be nice.

As you can see the side chain, which can be done with a crochet hook or can be stitch as a embroidery chain stitch, pulls it all together.

This has been a fun project.

Happy knitting,

KT

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