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This past year I decided to create beaded evening purses for each of my grand-daughters for Christmas.  As both of them are quit young, grandma might not be around for their especial events, or if I am, the fingers might not be working as well as they do now.

Both of these purses were constructed on a circle needle.  The first one is modeled  with a Honeycomb stitch pattern as I did in the first beaded bag I posted.  This time I scattered the beads on the body of the purse, and saved the fancy beading for the casing area.

taylors finished purseAs you can see, the shiny side of the lining shows through a bit.  Although the photo doesn’t do it justice, you get the idea.  I used round gold rings to connect the beaded strap, crocheting the tabs into the casing.

 

taylors finished purse- insideThis photo shows light reflections on the inside which are not in the lining, but it does show the construction of the zipper pocket.

taylors finished purse 2

This navy purse is very hard to photograph, but you can see the design on the casing.

The second purse is created with the Daisy Flower stitch.  I used my beads to form a diamond design on the body, and did some filigree and daisies on the casing.  You will also notice that I used a pearl bead every fifth bead in the strap.

becky's finished purse

Here are some close up details

becky's finished purse- inside

becky's finished purse- -handle daisy

becky's finished purse- -casing detail

These purses are constructed exactly like the one that I posted originally, the only difference being the pattern in the body, and the gauge.  This just shows you the variety that is possible.  There are many beautiful knit stitches that can be used for this purpose.   Try them out at- http://www.knittingunlimited.blogspot.com

Swatch for you gauge, and then go for it.

Just to keep them in min condition I made bags out of the lining.

purse and cover bag

I will be posting the beaded Daisy stitch chart after the holidays.

My next addition to this project is to make earrings to match.

taylor earring

My source for this idea was “Bead Allure” upload to my kindle for Amazon.

This next one I crocheted with the lace weight yarn used for the strap.  I finished the top by needle tatting a circle.

taylor earring crocheted

Just thought I would share.

Merry Christmas to All!!!!!

KT

Painting with Beads

bead evening bag flap 2Since my recently knitted purse expanded my knowledge of knitting with beads, I thought I would try and take it one step further-paint with them.  The above photo is of an evening bag flap that will cover the hex frame and lay smoothly to about 1 1/2 inches from the bottom edge of the purse.  The design features the letter”T” in the middle, with various swirls etc to complete the shape.  In order to accomplish this I had to come up with a method that did not interfere with the gauge, and yet allow me to insert beads every stitch if need be.  Hummmm……..?????????????????????

Let see–,using the slip stitch method on YOUTUBE requirew first  pre-stringing your beads onto the yarn; then work to where you want your bead, bring your yarn forward, slip the stitch purlwise, lay the bead at the base of the slipped stitch, then bring the yarn around the back to knit the next stitch.

So what’s the problem with that??  Well, the problem is that you can’t line up your beads together, you can only put them in every other stitch.

The next method uses a crochet hook to go through the bead, and bring the newly knitted stitch through the bead hole before replacing it on the right knitting needle.  This method does not require you to pre-string the beads, however, you can’t stack them or place them every stitch without greatly changing the gauge of your knitting.

Well, that won’t work!  So what to do?????

I want the beads to set on top of the knitted surface, so they will not affect the gauge.

I want to be able to chart my design.

I don’t want to have to count stitches and rows in order to put them in, if I wanted to do that I would do counted cross stitch.

I want to be able to tweek them a bit if needed to make the design.

After playing around a bit, beginning with the idea I shared with you in the lace curtain design, I came up with this.  You can call it whatever you want.  The nice thing is it works, as you can see in the photo above.

Here it is for you to play with- Painting with Beads

I have added some illustrations to make this process more clear.

 

I know you will come up with your own great ideas.

Go for it!

 

Happy knitting!  KT

This project has been developing as a possibility for some time, but I finally got my act in gear and just went for it.  This evening bag is knitted with “Navy Lindy Chain” yarn (Knitpicks) and combines both a Honeycomb stitch, with a bead inserted in the middle of each diamond formation. The casing for the facile hex purse frame is knitted in Stockinette.  The dazzling strap is beaded spiral rope construction of  .06 multi iris transparent beads and Curio crochet thread, both from Knitpicks.

beaded purse- night shot

The evening bag is 9 by 5, with a 42 inch spiral beaded strap.

beaded purse finished

 

Each of these photos were taken with different setting of the camera, because shiny beads are hard to capture.  The “night” and sunset” modes seem to do the best.

 

037

In the above photo, you can see the inside of the bag.  You will notice that I put a zipper pocket in the inside purse.   I made a complete purse with lining in a nice cotton fabric, then hand stitched the knitted purse over the top.  This gave me great stability, and as you can see, it even stands by itself.

There are “D” rings on each end, which hold the strap in place, yet don’t interfere with the hinge.

Beaded Honeycomb Purse

I have created a pdf instructional guide/pattern for you to use if you like.  Caution! This is not a quick knit, and it takes patience, but I think it was well worth it.

I will be working on various alternative straps and will upload the instructions as each one is completed.

This has been great fun, and definitely has gotten all kinds of “oo’s and ah’s” from everyone who has seen it.

I have never worked with beads before I designed the bathroom curtain that I shared in my recent post, but now that I have-look out!

Happy Knitting- KT

I recently finish a lace curtain set I made for my bathroom.  I used Curio from Knitpicks for my yarn.  It is truly a luxury crochet weight (lace)with a softness and sheen that is very lovely.  Below is a picture of the finished project.

lace curtain finished

When I had finished the main panel, I decide to get”cute” and trim the bottom edge  with rose colored beads to add a little contrast.

lace curtain bottom edge of center panel

When it came to the valance, I decided to try replacing the Nubbs/Bobbles with the rose colored beads.

lace curtain, beads for nubbs 3

*I know that there are some who will want to quibble over the terms bobbles and Nubbs, but for me, any time a pattern calls for me  to knit up more than 3sts in one knit, and gather it together in the purl row, I think of it as a bobble.  Maybe that is because I think of a bobble as something that “hangs,” and a nubb, as something that just makes a bump.  Anyway, it is the end results that counts.

It has been fun working with this great yarn, and adding the beads was just an extra bonus.

I have charted this pattern for you, along with instructions on how to replace the Nubbs/Bobbles with beads.  I am sure you will come up with more ideas once you get started.

Please take time to practice and swatch each section.  The cast on will be determined by your window.  I advise adding at least 4 inches in width for ease.

Lace Curtain Pattern

The lace curtain pattern includes instructions and charts for lower panel and valance.

* Note- you do not have to print off the last page of the pdf pattern.  As you will note, it has cross stitch info that is not for knitting-it’s just part of my charting program.

By the way, my window opening was 24 by 36, which is the area I wanted to cover.

 

Happy knitting- KT

PS – If you are a Ravelry member, you can get the free pattern there.  Just type in “Lace Curtain Set” by Judith Helms

 

The other day I was looking at my bathroom window and trying to decide whether I wanted to purchase a curtain or not.  Then, I came up with the brilliant idea of knitting one.

As I have a lot of knitting shawl patterns, I chose to use one that called for a “Lilly of the Valley” lace on the bottom edge.  Of course, that called for working with “Nubbs”,- you know, that stitch that calls for you to YO, knit one umpteen times, then purl all those loops together on the next row.

The results of this endeavor was that I came up with a short tutorial with some tips on how to handle the process so that my Nubbs were neat, and easier to purl together.

Below is a photo of the work in progress-

knitting nubs- lilly of the valley

This will look a lot better when it is blocked , but at least you can get an idea of what I am talking about.  My bathroom is grey, white and pink, so I opted for this silver lace cotton yarn from Knitpicks.

I hope this little tutorial will be of some help.  I mainly wrote is up for myself, so I can remember how I did it.

Ain’t old age great? 🙂

Knitting Nubbs tutorial

One more tip- if you you find one with a loop not laying right, on the knit side, you can insert a DPN into the center of the loops and gently work the slack out.

Happy knitting- KT

As most of you know, I love knitting something challenging.  That is why I am “into” knitting relief sculptures.  To that end, I thought I might share my thought process in planning for this type of knitting.

sparky pillow finished

 

The above pillow design (Sparky) has become the number one attraction in my home.  Everyone who comes has to pet the “dog.”  I can see that I will be sending this one to the groomer quite often.

As a result of the reaction to the realism of this design, I took on the project of creating another”doggie” pillow for one of my singing companions.

This is Angus!

angus chart plan

This time I will not only raise the dog, but I want realistic folds in his favorite blanket.

relief sculpture fans

So-besides adding an extra ply of yarn to the areas of the dog that I want to raise, I will create increases on one side of the ridges (solid black lines) which will allow me to create life like folds in the blanket surrounding the subject. Fans A,B, and C will be folded under, and the ridge will be on top. Fan “D” is just the opposite. The additional stitches forming the out side edge of the fan ( dotted line) will fold up to resemble the natural fold of the mounded fabric. The areas immediately adjacent to the fans will be filled to soften the incline to the folds.

* To see how I fill these areas, go to my post,”One Doggie Pillow, Done!”

OK! Now how will I mark the chart? Humm????

I will designate the ridge stitches with a solid circle.   I will place a marker on the each side of the ridge stitch.  As I add stitches I will move the fan side marker. to indicate the added stitch.  This way, I won’t have to mess with the chart, as these stitches will not be counted, I will simply knit the next stitch in the color indicated on the chart.   All the additional stitches will be added in the color of the ridge stitches.   I plan on keeping my fan width at no more than one inch, or 9 stitches at its widest part.  I will post the results of my experiment when finished.

Another possibility is to pick up stitch along the side of the head and knit the ear separately.  Hummmmmm…???????

I have ordered a  “fudge” colored kid mohair to be worked in with the varied colors on the dogs coat, and will use white mohair to add his graying hair on the face.  This should be a fun project.  I can’t wait to get started.

 

Just sharing-  KT

sparky pillow finished

Tada!  May I present “Sparky.”

This was absolutely a fun project, and I thought I  would share the finishing process with you.

The various modes of construction consisted of  Intarsia, Armenian knitting  and basic stockinette.  The subject in the design was created to be a relief sculpture.  This was accomplished by using 3 strands of lace weight mohair.  The additional strand enlarged the dog without adding stitches to the chart.  The background was done in Palette fingering weight from Knitpicks..

Once the knitting was complete, I washed and blocked the pillow top.

sparky pillow-blocked

The outside edges were blocked to an 18 inch square.  Next, I pinned out the dog, so that all the knitting lines in the background were straight, leaving all the extra width and length in the dog to puff up.

After the piece had dried, it was ready for me to start filling in the sculpture.

sparky pillow-creating relief - 1

In this case, the first area I filled was the muzzle, as I wanted it to stand out more than the rest of the head.  The next area was the tail, which he loves to swish around.  After putting a bit of fiber fill in these areas, I secured them by putting a piece of netting over the top and stitching it to the knitted surface that outlined the various parts, being careful to just catch a small amount of fiber from the back of the yarns.

sparky pillow-creating relief -  2

The next step was to fill in the head.  I pout more in the center of the head, then tapered the rest out to the edge of the ears.  the hip and legs were next.  How did I know how much to use- I didn’t.  I just turn it over and look.

sparky pillow-creating relief -  3

Once these areas have been filled I placed a piece of netting over the entire dog, and stitched around the edge of the subject to secure the filling.  Next, I turned it to the right side.  Using straight pins, I pinned down the areas I wanted to flatten, or define.  To secure the shape, I stitched it to the netting, from the back, always being careful to not have any threads show on the right side.   The next phase is making the pillow back.

Constructing the Back

For this particular pillow I wanted to make a looped fringe, using most of colors in the pillow top construction.  To do this I loosely knotted the yarns together, placed them in a bag, and hung the bag on the door adjacent to my sewing machine.

sparky pillow - making the looped fringe -1

With the right side of the back facing me, I placed a piece of tape 1 1/2  inches in from the edge of the fabric.  I set my foot for a 1/2 inch seam.

Using a figure 8 motion, I looped the yarns back and forth, extending the right side loop 1/4 in past the right edge of the fabric ( so I could hang on to it), and extended the left loop to just touch the tape.  I pushed these loops under the foot of my machine ( tight), and using tiny stitches, stitched them to the fabric.  It took a bit of practice, but soon I was moving right along.

sparky pillow - making the looped fringe -2

Here you can see that I have turned the corner.  I cropped my corners a bit, too.  It worked out well.

sparky pillow - making the looped fringe -3

About 2 hours later-  I’m just kidding, but it isn’t a quick job.

sparky pillow - making the looped fringe -4

Now I am ready to sew the pillow top to the back- well maybe.

To avoid any chance that the loops should get caught in my sewing I opted to baste them in place, using some old seam binding.  This just took a few minutes, but was well worth it, as I didn’t have to worry where those pesky loops were lying.  I also zigzagged the fringe to the fabric edge, then trim the over hanging loops from the edge, leaving a clean edge to line up my pillow top.  sparky pillow finished - relief demo

Here is a side view of the relief.

Yeah!  Now I have two Sparky’s!

Just sharing- KT