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Posts Tagged ‘Armenian Knitting’

I was so glad to get this one done so I could send it to my grandson.  He has been checking on it’s progress the last few months, so now he won’t have to wait anymore.

I had great fun knitting this one.  I even knitted some extra leaves, which I placed in the front of the duck, stuffing them a bit to give it a 3 dimensional look.

One other thing I did differently from the last pillow was to make my own pillow form.  I discovered that most of the forms  (no matter what you pay for them) are made with clumps of fiber fill, often leaving a lumpy surface.  Of course, that is unacceptable when you have spent many hours working on one of these pillow tops.  The only solution-make it yourself.

I began the process with a sheet of Poly-fill quilt batting.   I cut two 17 inch squares, then machine sewed them together on three sides, using a long stitch.   I stuffed the middle with tiny pieces of fill, poked them in place with a #1 DPN, then whipped the open edge shut.  You could even use two thickness (sheets) for each side to unsure an even smoother surface.   Anyway, it  worked great.  It will also dry much faster as there is no cloth on the inside.

I will be making all my pillow forms from now on.

Now it’s time to box it up and head to the UPS store.  My grandson will be a happy camper!

I hope to have this pillow pattern available soon.  I will be starting my J’s Designer Pillow page soon.

KT

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One of the techniques I use to shape my pillow tops is to block them on the needles.   I use the cords of two 47 inch circle needles.  Needle A, goes across the top and down the left side.  Needle B holds the stitches across the bottom and up the right side.  This allows me to use the cords as blocking rods.  Below is a picture of my latest Needlepoint Knitting pillow top.  This one is for my grandson, who is a mighty hunter. 🙂

The stitches have been picked up on the edges and are set up to knit the tubing for my corded edge.  This process is completed before I wash the top.   Notice the cord loops in the corners;  needle A, in the upper left corner, and needle B in the lower right corner.  These loops free the cord, allowing me to pull the edges straight.   To secure the pillow top in place,  I use T pins.  It works great.

When dry,  I will be knitting the tubing using the same method used for working with 2 circle needles in the round.  You can find this method by typing in “socks on two circles,” or “knitting with two circle needles,” in you search engine.   There are some good videos on YouTube.

Thought you might like to see this-thought it might be helpful.

Happy knitting- KT

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It definitely is Spring around here, as the wild  flowers are blooming and the mountains are turning green.  Add this to the birds singing and the butterflies checking out the blooms and next thing you know I found myself drawing up a new pillow design of daisies and butterflies.

As before, this chart is gauged for 8 stitches and 11 rows, knitted with fingering yarn.  I will be using Knitpicks Palette yarn for this design.  The chart for the detailed crocheted lines and specialty stitches are included in the download.  The knitted cording instructions are in the PDF file listed below.

Of course, you can use the center motif on other projects.  Here is the pattern – daisies and butterfly pillow

For knitted cording instructions, Knitted Cording Instructions   This file includes instructions for joining knitted back.

Give it a try –

KT

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I just finished another Whitetail Buck pillow.  This one has a knitted cording incorporated into the pillow top, along with the seam allowance to help in sewing it to a cloth back.   I even made my own cording.  It was fun!

The picture below is a “snip-it” of a section of the cord that frames the pillow.  Here you see it in contrast with the cloth back.   I have to say that there is no comparison to the commercial cording available.  I have tried finding complimentary edging for this use, but have always been disappointed.  The fillers they use are mostly cotton, and seem lumpy at best, not to mention that they take a much longer time to dry.  That is why I decided on this approach-make your own.  In addition, there is no better match in color than the actual yarn you are using in your project.

I will be adding this pattern to the Pattern Catalog page, so feel free to upload it.  The pattern contains 18 pages of detailed charts and instructions.  You can use Intarsia, Armenian Knitting, and sections of Fair Isle in this project.

The Basics

1.  Knit the Basic chart.

2. Identify and secure all loose stitches

3. Weave in the ends

4. Block pillow top on needles (This works great!)

4. Pick up stitches to begin tube for cording

5. Knit tubing

6. Close tubing, and make button hole opening for cording.

7. Knit seam allowance

8.  (opt)  Secure pillow top to woven fabric.

9. Prepare fabric back, and sew to pillow top, make cording.

10. Insert cording.  Stitch pillow close.  Adjust cording.  Close cording opening.

10. Decide on some of the options I have for making the pillow cover removable for washing.

The pattern walks you through all the above issues.  Wow!!  And that ALL???  I’m tired just making the list.  But trust me, it was worth it.  My friend Deb at Tempting Tangles ( see link on side bar) has given it her approval.

 You will also be given instructions on making your own cording out of poly quilt batting, which, of course, makes it lighter, and easier to dry when washed.  This particular pattern is backed with fabric that has been pre-washed, so the entire pillow can be “dunked” in Wool wash, squeezed out, then air dried without much fuss.

My hope that you will try your hand at color knitting.  I also hope you will take a look at my “Painting with Yarn” E-book when it comes off the press.  The book contains all my color knitting experience on this project, along with detailed illustrations and how to’s, or what I call, “Technical Tutoring.”  I hope to have it available for you soon.  Would you believe it, I am already up to 60 pages!

As a side note, I will be uploading a couple of new tutorials on my “Multi-color Knitting Tips” page.  Check them out.

Happy Knitting!

KT

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