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Archive for the ‘crocheted flowers’ Category

I delivered this arrangement to my friends this morning.  They were delighted.  Many people think I am crazy, but all the hours I put into this are worth it, when I see the smiles on their faces.

It is currently being displayed with dignity on their black baby grand piano.  There are also plans to provide a flash light handy for anyone who wants to view the details of the underside of the Morpho butterfly.

*You will see that the maiden’s fern is not in the mix. Why?  I have discovered that it looks better when there are no more than 3 crocheted elements in an arrangement.

So…..what’s next?  I am working on development of this stitch and it’s possible use in other projects.  As I perfect these variations, I will share with those who are interested.  Right now, I am working on using to colors, as I do in Intarsia knitting.  I think the possibilities are endless.

But….for now, it is nice to have this one finished.

KT

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As I mulled over the elements I wanted for my Morpho Butterfly arrangement (butterfly, Baby’s Breath, Maiden Hair fern, stems and grasses), I found I was lacking 1 essential item- a flower that my butterfly could land on.  So, I did a little research and found out that since  this butterfly comes from Central America region, then one of the flowers from the same region is what I needed.  My choice- red Hibiscus.  Not only is it gorgeous, but red is one of the background colors of the room where it will be displayed.

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Here it is in all it’s glory!

Now to examine my subject.  I noticed that the “vein’s” of the petals run vertically, just as they do in my butterfly veins.  So with that in mind, and using size 40 thread and a .09 hook, I made a sample.

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Once I had played around with this, I decided to write up the process, hoping to encourage some of you to do the same.

To start with, the paper template you see in the last photo was my guide.

hibiscus petal template with instr

Hibiscus Petal Illustration

The green lines and directional arrows, are the wires (size 32g, red).  Those wires are divided as shown in the illustration.  A and B will be used to secure the petal to the main stem.  The center 6 wires will establish the center pistols and stamen, which are at least the length of one petal plus some.  One wire from each petal with be the top of the 5 pistols and have a red bead to finish them off.  The other wires will be pealed off one at a time, trimmed to length and finish with a #11 yellow seed bead.  You can see those wires in the last photo.

By using the wires in the manner I did, I am able to flute the edge.  I add even more detail in the solid red areas, as I enclose the wire turn.  Here I can sc, hdc, etc, defining the edge as I like.  I can do the same with the 2 veins that do NOT have the wire turn.  *On the sample I did not add all the scallops.

The solid blue section of this illustration will be worked as one vein.

This may seem complicated to some, but for me it is fun.  Keep in mind that this is a guide, and I am always open to changing things as needed.  Another thing is that nature is not perfect, so any slight variation in the petals is more perfect than you think.

I can not wait for my red wire to arrive so I can get started on the Hibiscus.

I will keep you updated on the progress.

 

 

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This is an arrangement that I am working on for a friend.  It is call a Papilio Ulysses butterfly.  It was quite fun to make.

As before, I worked from a picture I printed off my computer.  As my “bug” Dr. had exactly the specimen for me to take the photo of, I had the size correct from the beginning.

 

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The above photo shows you what I was looking at.  Here you see the the upper wings completed, while the lower wing is just at the beginning stage.

All the work on this project was created using crochet thread size 40, 80, and 2 strand of Guttermeins metallic embroidery threads.  Hook size was .060

For all of my work on these butterfly projects, I have used what I call “closed” stitches.   For example, instead of using a yarn over to make a loop on the hook for a dc (double crochet), I pull up the loop through a thread of the post of the previous dc. Next, I then insert the hook into the next st an complete the dc.    When you do this , you will note that the loop pulled up through the post connects the two stitches, thus filling in the holes more solidly.   This is especially important when working with the metallic thread (2 strands), as it makes the shiny surface look more solid.

As you can see by my last several projects, this has become an addiction.  The possibilities are endless.  🙂

The Finished Arrangement

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I will share the carnation pattern when I am done.

Just sharing.

 

KT

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Just finished the project below.  My Monarch now has a home.               016 (2)

As I was working on putting my roses leaves together I thought I would share the process with you.  I have written a basic idea tutorial with photos.

The one thing that stood out to me when I looked at my rose bush was that the rose leaves and stems are two colors.  The tops of the leaves are shiny and dark, the bottom are lighter in color and match the stems.

As I am a nut for making things as close to nature as I can, I decided to make my leaves two colors also.  The simple solution was to paint the backs with acrylic pain.  This actually serves two purposes.  First it  changes the shade of the thread to a lighter green, and secondly, it stiffens the leaves, while sealing the threads.

I found that using a small damp sponge worked great.  Being careful to wipe off the excess, I gently sponged in the paint a little at a time, allowing it to dry in between coats.  I also used a fine short pointed artist brush to define the central vein on the top side.

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For this particular arrangement I chose to use sets of 3 leaves together.  The larger one for the center, and the two slightly smaller ones for the sides.

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I used a backward cast on loop, (Josephine knot) to wrap the wires and secure the leaves in place on the stem.  I use Hard as Nails to secure any place I need to reinforce.

The rose you see in the middle of the arrangement is made directly off the center bud structure, and the edges of the petals are just stiffened with clear Hard as Nails as well.  I love the stuff. No wires needed.

One technique that emerged from this experiment was what I call  closed triple crochet.  This can be worked with other sts (dc, hdc,etc) as well.

I found that if I pick up one of the loops to create the stitch in the post, or chain to the right , it closes the gap sometimes occurring at the beginning of a row or change in increases, or decreases.  I use it often when shaping the close of a row that needs to be tapered at the end, or when I begin a row where I want a smooth edge.

Example, if I need a dc to begin the row, I chain up, then, instead of a yo to make the stitch, I pick up the loop in the middle of my chain, then insert the hook into the hole at the base of the stitch.

If the direction call for starting the row in the second stitch from hook, I pick up the dc loop from the middle of the chain, or in some cases the hole at the base of the chain, then insert my hook into the next st (2nd), then complete the dc.

It works well for me and keeps my edge sts smooth and snug, no gaps.

 

Here is the pdf of my process.  It is for you to play with.

Crocheted Rose Leaves

KT

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I just couldn’t wait to share this with you.  I have been having so much fun working on this project.

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I am going to add this crocheted Monarch butterfly to an arrangement I am making for a dear friend’s mom.  She loves the Monarch, so naturally I had to include it with the yellow rose that I am making for her.

Below is another photo taken by my local “bug” man.  He is my official “eye” and chief.  When he says, “You got it,”  I know it’s right.

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If I come up with an pattern in the future I will definitely share, but for now, I am still working it out.

Every butterfly is different, however, the venation (veins) for this particular group of butterflies is the same, only the colors and sizes are different.

It has been quite an education, and great fun, especially when people think it is real.  🙂

Just sharing-

KT

 

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I just had to share this with you before is begins it’s journey to California.

The crocheted Magnolia’s form the main focus of the arrangement, but the butterfly adds the pizazz.  I would give you the name of the species, but my friend and entomologist is not handy at the moment-  that said, it’s as long as you arm.  🙂

Creating this butterfly was quite a challenge, but well worth it.  As I wanted it anatomically correct, I sought out my neighbor, who had a collection of this species.  What a help that was.

Butterfly Structure

The upper wings are constructed with a wired support at the top vein, the lower have the wired vein on the inner edge.  Both are secure with these wires to the crocheted body, which itself is constructed over #26 wire.

The method I used was to crochet the “rise” (or shape of the vein, using sc to tr variations), then reverse slip st in front loop to created a raise edge.  This is just like reverse single crochet, but with a slipped stitch.  This method gives you complete flexibility in shaping wings, as you are always going back to the beginning and working on the right side.

I used a black pearl bead for the head and the two body wire ends for the antennae.  Hard as Nails black finished the job.

The details on the upper created using satin stitch and #40 thread.  The black dots on the lower wing are black seed bead, (#11), the silver satin stitch is #100 nylon thread.

I created a mount for the butterfly with a crocheted button, attach to a stem wire.  I have found that the most stable method for all my flowers is making a 90 degree bend (about and inch) at the top of the wire, then bending the inch portion into a circle that ends up centered over the main stem. * A small vice is very helpful to hold the main stem while you bend the circle.

All of this project is made with #40 thread, and a .06 hook.  The flowers were made with #20 thread and 1.0 hook.

*Crocheting over wire-  Make a foundation chain of desired length.  Holding wire (#26)in left hand lay wire on thread between hook and working thread. Chain one st, securing wire.  Holding wire in left hand, and insert hook in second chain st from hook(lying just below wire), push hook under wire, yarn over hook and pull loop through. Yarn over once more and complete single crochet.  Continue down foundation chain to last stitch.  I always make 3-7 sc in last stitch before the return.  Bend wire until it lies flush with the bottom of foundation chain.  Work single crochet down opposite side, inserting hook in loops of previous row, making sure that your hook goes under the wire every time.

  • You can secure the beginning tail after the turn, by laying it along the wire.

Happy crocheting- KT

 

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