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Archive for the ‘crocheted rose leaves’ Category

My rose finally has a home.  I added a few items to the mix, but not much-just enough to support the stem and leaf structure.

I might add another rose or bud someday, but for now it is enough to know that my idea worked.

I do like the look of the leaves much better than normal crochet, as they are smoother, and I was able to make them more life like.  They are in the foreground hanging over the Baby’s Breath.

Just sharing!

KT

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I have been working with this stitch for a while in the hopes that I could produce a fabric like “look.”  I wanted the stitch to be flatter than normal crocheted posts, as I wanted to be able to paint and embroidery on it.  The results of my efforts are shown in the photo below.

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This large “Peace and Love” rose is a duplicate of the one that is in my back yard, and my husband’s favorite.  He wanted me to immortalize it for posterity.  🙂

*Just as a side note- got a test from a friend

She asked if the rose was made of painted fabric and dried over a mold of some kind.  This, of course, let me know that I had achieved my goal.

As of now I am working on the leaves, and will be adding them as it section is completed.

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The photo above shows my work in progress.  The leaf at the far right is almost finished.  You can see that each vein is worked separately.  The leaves on the far left are finished to their base, and details are embroidered with #80 crochet thread.

My leaf pattern is a duplicate of the original leaves in two sizes, as the rose I cut from the bush had leaves in groups of three, one large and two small.

It has been a fun project.

I will upload the finished product soon.

My man will be happy.

 

Just sharing, KT

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Just finished the project below.  My Monarch now has a home.               016 (2)

As I was working on putting my roses leaves together I thought I would share the process with you.  I have written a basic idea tutorial with photos.

The one thing that stood out to me when I looked at my rose bush was that the rose leaves and stems are two colors.  The tops of the leaves are shiny and dark, the bottom are lighter in color and match the stems.

As I am a nut for making things as close to nature as I can, I decided to make my leaves two colors also.  The simple solution was to paint the backs with acrylic pain.  This actually serves two purposes.  First it  changes the shade of the thread to a lighter green, and secondly, it stiffens the leaves, while sealing the threads.

I found that using a small damp sponge worked great.  Being careful to wipe off the excess, I gently sponged in the paint a little at a time, allowing it to dry in between coats.  I also used a fine short pointed artist brush to define the central vein on the top side.

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For this particular arrangement I chose to use sets of 3 leaves together.  The larger one for the center, and the two slightly smaller ones for the sides.

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I used a backward cast on loop, (Josephine knot) to wrap the wires and secure the leaves in place on the stem.  I use Hard as Nails to secure any place I need to reinforce.

The rose you see in the middle of the arrangement is made directly off the center bud structure, and the edges of the petals are just stiffened with clear Hard as Nails as well.  I love the stuff. No wires needed.

One technique that emerged from this experiment was what I call  closed triple crochet.  This can be worked with other sts (dc, hdc,etc) as well.

I found that if I pick up one of the loops to create the stitch in the post, or chain to the right , it closes the gap sometimes occurring at the beginning of a row or change in increases, or decreases.  I use it often when shaping the close of a row that needs to be tapered at the end, or when I begin a row where I want a smooth edge.

Example, if I need a dc to begin the row, I chain up, then, instead of a yo to make the stitch, I pick up the loop in the middle of my chain, then insert the hook into the hole at the base of the stitch.

If the direction call for starting the row in the second stitch from hook, I pick up the dc loop from the middle of the chain, or in some cases the hole at the base of the chain, then insert my hook into the next st (2nd), then complete the dc.

It works well for me and keeps my edge sts smooth and snug, no gaps.

 

Here is the pdf of my process.  It is for you to play with.

Crocheted Rose Leaves

KT

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